Alexandria Police Increasing Patrol Operations

Alexandria Police are adjusting patrol operations after more than a month of modified services due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

That means that residents will see more officers on the street, including officers on motorcycles — in addition to an already established police presence at food distribution points, potential gathering points and at COVID-19 testing sites throughout the city, according to police spokesman Lieutenant Courtney Ballantine.

“This is a very fluid situation, and we’re supporting our allies, the health care workers and other city agencies,” Ballantine said. “As the weather turns and people will be out, we will have to take a hard look at social distancing enforcement and supporting our fellow agencies.”

The department also previously had a finite amount of personal protective equipment, and that is no longer the case. Additionally, school resource officers are doing community engagement work.

“As things continue down the road we will be more visible,” he said.

ALXnow reported a 42% reduction in calls for service in March, and the numbers are starting to increase, Ballantine said. Last month, police saw a decrease in service calls involving assaults, noise complaints and mental health cases, and an increase in trespassing and domestic violence.

ALXnow is expecting updated statistics on crime and service calls in the near future.

Staff photo by James Cullum

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