Newsletter

This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Lisa Groover with McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Lisa at 703.919.4426 or email [email protected] You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: What sort of previous experience do I need to become a real estate agent?

Answer: I knew I wanted to be in real estate when I was in college, and a young agent was extremely uncommon. For that reason, I went into the hotel business, was a meeting planner, and sold promotional products before I started my fourth career.

Now, we are seeing new agents right out of school (or soon thereafter) — especially when other members of their family are in the industry. I am thrilled to have been contacted by a senior from Alexandria City High School who wanted to intern with an agent as part of her Senior Experience. She will be heading off to Virginia Tech in the fall to major in Environmental Economics; however, as one of her first careers, she would like to take part in real estate.

We have attended McEnearney’s business meetings, training sessions, open houses, closings, and she even already met with our recruiter!

According to Effirata Berasu, “Working with Lisa has been the best experience to learn about the world of real estate!”

Quite a few agents are like me in that they have been in one or more fields prior to entering real estate. I always like to ask my fellow agents what they did before they got into the business. In addition to previous sales roles, you would be surprised at some of the other answers, such as bankers, attorneys, teachers, nurses, photographers, writers, engineers, interior designers, construction contractors, home inspectors, technology fields, landscapers, and so many more.

For me, my previous experience taught me to be a collaborator, a good listener, a creative resource, and a detail-oriented professional. Others bring skills from their former lives that they continue to use, allowing for the right agent for everyone.

Since buying or selling a house can be extremely stressful, it is important to work with someone that is the right fit for you and your lifestyle or personality. Select an agent that makes you feel comfortable.

We just had a workshop on different personality styles and how they work with other similar or entirely different types of people. It was interesting to identify the traits for the “power,” “party,” “peace,” and “perfection” categories. Are they risk takers that are more bottom-line oriented? Or people that don’t like change and, therefore, are slower in making decisions? Do they rely on the present, future, or need information from the past to establish their next steps? Is data a key factor, or do they count on a gut reaction?

I love the testimonial from a client that chose to work with me after interviewing several other agents.

“Lisa is a joy to work with and is highly flexible and collaborative. Her ability to use the latest marketing technology effectively brought us a buyer in two days. Her warm personality and excellent interpersonal skills turned a stressful time into a truly enjoyable experience. Our thanks and appreciation for Lisa as a partner in selling our home in Old Town Alexandria.” – Jasper Womach and Marilynne Black

When people ask me how they can get started, I share my personal experience. Before I was licensed, I went to 5-10 open houses every weekend to learn about neighborhoods, price ranges, home styles, staging, and how the agents interacted with the attendees. When I became an agent, I worked 39 out of 52 weekends holding open houses for other agents until I established my own listings. In addition to the post-licensing education that is required once you pass your test and “hang” your license with a firm, I did my best to attend as many workshops and training sessions as possible in order to hit the ground running. Having a designated McEnearney mentor for my first 6 months allowed me to gain real-life knowledge from an extremely experienced and well-respected agent. We continue to collaborate and even share a storage unit for our staging items.

My best advice for a new agent is to ask questions!

Good luck!

If you would like a question answered in our weekly column or to set up an appointment with one of our Associates, please email: [email protected] or call 703.549.9292

McEnearney Associates Realtors®, 109 S. Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. www.McEnearney.com Equal Housing Opportunity. #WeAreAlexandria

0 Comments

This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Rebecca McCullough with McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Rebecca McCullough at 571-384-0941 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

While I am not an economist, as a Realtor, part of my job is to stay on top of understanding our economy, what interest rates are doing, and how they are affecting our market.

We have been on a wild ride with interest rates historically low for the past couple of years, driving buyer demand and resulting in a shortage of homes on the market. Sellers have been basking in escalated sales prices, earning deep pocket returns on their investments.

We have been at historically low rates for so long now, it’s easy to think that it’s the norm and will last. This is especially true for first-time home buyers. Many buyers want to hope that they will come back down again, and as they wait, interest rates may creep back up to the six or seven percent range, before the fall again.

Because of these factors and more, some would-be buyers still believe the current market is a bubble, and that home prices “won’t stay this high.” While unlikely, it’s certainly tempting to hope that interest rates will “come down again,” and “home prices will come back to ‘normal.'”

On May 4, 2022, the Fed announced another rate increase — the highest single increase in the past two decades. This disappointed a lot of buyers who witnessed their purchasing power decrease, all while properties in Northern Virginia are still experiencing strong demand, so prices are not dropping.

In this market, we have to be conscious to distinguish between national statistics and local happenings. Northern Virginia (NOVA) will continue to experience business development and growth over the next decade. Yes, inflation is rising as are interest rates, and although it may soften the market, it isn’t going to make buying houses any less expensive any time soon, in my opinion.

I believe NOVA should expect the market to become a little more balanced. I do not expect a “buyers’ market” any time soon, however. Here are a few factors driving that view:

  • New builds are still way down. We have a 5 million homes shortage in the U.S. and demand still outstrips supply in NOVA.
  • Supply chain woes and labor shortages. Building new homes is taking longer.
  • More subtle, but putting on constraint on supply is that many current homeowners have little incentive to move. Getting a new mortgage at a higher rate is not motivating, and the same supply constraints impact them.

Sellers will likely remain in the power position for quite some time. What will happen with interest rates? Good question — I don’t think even the experts know.

In reality, trying to time the market is very difficult. Wishing for factors to change in your favor may leave you delayed in owning your home for far longer than anticipated, or at a higher cost than anticipated.

After ten years in this industry, my advice is to buy when you need or truly want to move, and buy a home that you can afford. What you can afford is determined by a combination of these factors:

  • Your down payment
  • Sale price of the home
  • Interest rate you can secure
  • Monthly payment you can afford and feel comfortable with

Lenders often surprise borrowers as to how much they can borrow. It is often more than they expect. But is that the same as what they can afford? I always recommend that my buyers determine a few factors on their own, including: how much disposable income you need and like to have each month, and what does your monthly mortgage payment need to be in order for you to live comfortably? Don’t be persuaded by what you “can” do in lender’s terms and take on more than you “want” to do and can feel good about.

Buyers truly need to understand their needs. Your next house doesn’t have to be your forever home but may be a step in that journey. So, consider buying a little smaller now if it’s a neighborhood you love. Buy a house that needs some work. Invest in the house so you can get a little or low return on your investment, then move somewhere down the road into your next home. It’s a lot more common these days to own more than 1-2 homes in a lifetime. Hey, I’m on number nine!

Rebecca McCullough is a licensed real estate agent in Virginia with McEnearney Associates, Inc. in Old Town Alexandria, VA. If you would like more information on selling or buying in today’s complex market, contact Rebecca at 571-384-0941 or visit her website RebeccaMcCullough.com.

If you would like a question answered in our weekly column or to set up an appointment with one of our Associates, please email: [email protected] or call 703-549-9292.

McEnearney Associates Realtors®, 109 S. Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. www.McEnearney.com Equal Housing Opportunity. #WeAreAlexandria

0 Comments

This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Hope Peele of The Peele Group and McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact The Peele Group at 703-244-6115 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: What’s a silly question when it comes to real estate?

Answer: “I have a silly question” is something that I hear far too frequently and is usually followed by a question that I’ve been asked before and isn’t silly at all. Frankly, in my opinion, there are no silly questions.

Before I went full-time into real estate, I taught health to 6-12th graders. Like real estate, the stakes were pretty high if questions went unasked. Believe me when I reiterate my opinion that there are NO silly questions. If there is something that you want to know about one of the largest purchases you will likely make, don’t be afraid to ask!

In the meantime though, here are a few of the most commonly asked “silly” questions that I get ALL the time!

What is the difference between settlement and closing? A.K.A what does *this word* mean?

Actually, they are the same. When a buyer agrees upon a settlement or closing date in their offer, it’s important to understand that this is the date that you will purchase your new home and that funds will be due.

Let’s be honest, no one likes to stop a conversation to ask what a word means. But in any industry, there are terms that professionals can sometimes take for granted that those outside of the industry will know what they mean. If a buyer or seller and their agent are not on the same page in terms of language, then mistakes and miscommunications are bound to happen.

For example, many people hear the term “in escrow” on TV and in movies and are looking forward to this step so that they can finally tell the world that they are onto the next step in their lives!

However, in my experience, most agents in this area use the terminology “under contract” to describe when an offer is accepted and the buyer has put money down towards their new home. In reality, a person isn’t “in escrow” — their money is. We describe “in escrow” as the place where money is kept safe until the home closes or –in the case of buyer default — some of it may go to the seller. This is just a small differentiation, but if a buyer is expecting to go “in escrow,” and their agent says they are “under contract,” there may be some confusion. It is important to remember to always ask what terms mean. This is not a silly question!

How long will the sale process take?

Of course, this is different for everyone, but there are general timelines you can look to when buying or selling a home. The typical time from contract to settlement has usually been 30 days.

For a buyer, it’s important for your realtor to discuss the seller’s preferences with their realtor. They may want a quick settlement, or if they need to stay in the home for a while, a later settlement may make more sense.

Most sellers will want a quick settlement so that they receive their money earlier. However, every situation is different.

A buyer will need to give an Earnest Money Deposit within the timeframe they have committed to in the contract. This is usually 3 to 5 days after the contract is ratified. It will then go towards the total of the costs needed at settlement. The day before settlement, they should submit the rest of the money due, including any additional closing costs, less the deposit they’ve already paid. Many settlement companies now will allow for a mobile deposit-for all of the funds to be paid securely online before you even sit at the settlement table.

Read More

0 Comments

This week’s Q&A column is written by Sallie Seiy of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Sallie at 703-798-4666 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns

Question: I feel like I could live in a few neighborhoods. How do I narrow it down?

Answer: We’re fortunate that we live in an area with three jurisdictions to pick from! But it can be overwhelming when you can envision yourself in a lot of different areas. There are lots of things to consider when picking your next home — not only the home itself, but where that home lies.

Here are a few ideas to help you focus in on the areas that really match what you’re looking for.

First start with the type of environment. Do you favor walkability to attractions or transportation? Would you like to be right in the middle of the city? Do you prefer a smaller pocket neighborhood? Are you looking for a more suburban, tree-lined street? Would a rural property serve you and your needs better? What should the neighborhood sound like — calm or clamorous? What type of property best suits you — detached, condominium, or townhouse?

Next, I recommend focusing on accessibility to things that matter to you. Whether it’s in the middle of the city or suburbia, we all have favorite places and things to do that we’d like to be somewhat near the place we call home. A big way to direct your focus on this question is to think about where you live now. What do you wish your current neighborhood had? Or what would you change?

  • How long do you want your commute to be? Are you needing public transportation (bus or Metro)? Do you need to be walking distance to transit or are you ok with driving to it? Does a commute not even matter anymore because you work from home?
  • Do you have other places you frequently have to get to? School, airport?
  • What about accessibility to restaurants or nightlife?
  • Think of those everyday tasks: doctor’s office, vet, grocery store, pharmacy, post office, gas stations.
  • Do you have a dog that needs a dog park? Or maybe a yard would be better for your timid pooch?

If you have children or plan to have kids, school districts may be something to consider. Reaching out to the school districts themselves or finding a PTA group on Facebook can be helpful when deciding.

Another factor you may not be immediately thinking of — taxes! There are varying tax rates across the three jurisdictions: state income taxes, property tax rates, car tax in Virginia, etc.

Once you have those lists narrowed down, spend time in those top neighborhoods at all different hours. Go on a Saturday morning walk. Do a date night on a Tuesday evening. Talk to people/neighbors.

Most importantly, think of your daily routine. Go through a day in your life, starting and ending in the neighborhood.

Finally, a lot of what it comes down to is your gut. Does this place feel like home?

If you are looking to start your home search, please give me a call!

As a fifth generation Realtor and the granddaughter of an architect and builder, Sallie has deep roots in real estate. She is passionate for the charm, history, and architecture of Alexandria and its surrounding communities. If you would like more information on selling or buying in today’s complex market, contact Sallie today at 703-798-4666 or visit her website SallieSeiy.com.

If you would like a question answered in our weekly column or to set up an appointment with one of our Associates, please email: [email protected] or call 703-549-9292.

McEnearney Associates Realtors®, 109 S. Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. www.McEnearney.com Equal Housing Opportunity. #WeAreAlexandria

0 Comments

This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Brian Bonnet, Senior Loan Officer (NMLS ID# 224811) of Atlantic Coast Mortgage, LLC (NMLS ID# 643114). To learn more about current mortgage rates and the home loan process, contact Brian at 703-766-6702 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: How can my mortgage lender help my offer win a bidding contest?

Answer: Anyone who has been thinking about purchasing a home within the past year has heard over and over how competitive the marketplace is. The severe lack of residential inventory has affected all price points and all types of properties. Rising interest rates may cause some purchasers to exit the process, but the need for housing will have a greater impact on the continued supply/demand equation.

Price and net proceeds are obviously important factors in the seller’s decision-making process, but several other factors related to financing can make the difference between a prospective purchaser being successful or having to find another home and write another contract. As a purchaser there are several things you can do related to financing which can make you more attractive to sellers.

First, you must be preliminarily approved for your financing. Your offer will not be considered without that preliminary approval. Additionally, you should choose a local lender. Seasoned listing agents have all had transactions which settled late or did not happen at all because a big-box lender or Skippy’s mortgage.com failed. They may get the job done 90% of the time, but that means they do not 10% of the time.

Local lenders and their reputations are often known to the listing agent and local lenders will use locally-based appraisers. Local appraisers tend to know the nuances of neighborhoods and are more likely to generate quality appraisals. With multiple offers on the table, listing agents are likely to recommend to the seller that they ratify the contract which proposes financing through a local lender.

Next, talk with your lender about whether you can waive your financing and appraisal contingencies. It is not wise for some purchasers to waive the financing contingency, but other purchasers are virtually assured of loan approval, as long as they don’t walk in and tell their bosses to pound sand. Have a frank conversation with your lender about the risk (or lack thereof) of waiving the financing contingency. Many contracts are ratified with no financing contingency.

Read More

0 Comments

This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Ann Duff of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Ann at 703-965-8700 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns

Question: “Where do these Broadway lyrics come from?” says my real estate-muddled brain.

Answer: Oh, you may have you been singing the BLUES because the movers are delayed or prepping for a sale has forced you into an AirBnB while the bathrooms are being gutted.

But BROADWAY covers all the bases and it is time to name the shows which match your experiences:

“All I want is a room somewhere, far away from the cold, night air, with one enormous chair — oh, wouldn’t it be loverly?”

Could this be you after months of Open Houses and multiple contracts?

“Please, sir, I want some more?”

Could this be hungry you waiting now for 6+ months for the stove or refrigerator you ordered to be built and delivered? Supply chain issues, eh?

“I wanna be in the room where it happens.”

Need your own home office where you can get work accomplished and ZOOM without distractions?

“A candle’s in the window and the kettle’s always on.”

Want friends and family nearby and welcome after years of anonymous high-rise living?

“Five hundred twenty-five thousand, six hundred minutes.”

Heck, it is only a year, but is this how long it has taken you to finally get rid of that old futon or gently help your child clean up his/her credit?

“And the wavin’ wheat can sure smell sweet, when the wind comes right behind the rain.”

Don’t you love the fresh cut grass smell right after the lawn guys come spruce up your yard?

“I think I’m gonna like it here!”

Finally finding the perfect neighborhood with the right combination of Metro stop, coffee shop and bike paths.

“Master of the house, doling out the charm, ready with a handshake and an open palm.”

Sound like the Sellers you’ve been running into?

“We did what we had to do, won’t forget, can’t regret, what I did for Love.”

Oops, do you now have 3.5 growing kids in a two-bedroom apartment?

Read More

0 Comments

This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Hope Peele of The Peele Group and McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact The Peele Group at 703-244-6115 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: Interest rates are rising! What does that mean to you as a buyer or a seller?

Answer: Mortgage interest rates have already jumped significantly in the last month or two, leaving both sellers and buyers to speculate what this could mean to them. Buyers are wondering if it’s even worth it to still try to buy a home when their buying power has diminished. Sellers are wondering whether they missed that sweet spot for listing, since many buyers may be getting discouraged, or not even qualify any longer, due to higher interest rates.

The rate on a 30-year mortgage changed by 0.29%, just in the last week, according to CNET.

By all accounts, it will continue to be a sellers’ market in Northern Virginia and beyond. While many buyers are giving up and renting for another year, there is still a huge demand for housing — and very short supply. If you are thinking about selling your home, rest assured, there will be buyers.

However, despite the strong demand, sellers benefit immensely by preparing their home properly as I discussed here last month. Even in a sellers’ market, fresh paint, the condition of floors, the degree of updating and all the regular visible maintenance will affect how many buyers want the property and the sales price. The key will be in deciding which improvements will do the most to increase your return on investment and assure a speedy sale. An experienced Realtor will help you make the right decisions so that you don’t waste money on updates that won’t make much difference in sales price or buyer appeal.

If you are trying to buy a home, don’t be discouraged! Buying a home is ALL about preparation, especially in a market like this. The best way to be fully prepared is to have an “ace team” to guide you through the process. Every team needs a leader, and that should be an excellent Realtor. They will help you plan your strategy, and can introduce you to the best lenders, home inspectors, and vendors. Your Realtor will be there with you from start to finish, helping to keep everyone focused on achieving your goals.

Read More

5 Comments

This week’s Q&A column is written by David Howell, Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer, of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant market news, contact David at 703-738-9513 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: How was the first quarter 2022 real estate market in the City of Alexandria?

Answer: Each quarter we take an in-depth look at contract activity in the City of Alexandria compared to the same quarter of the previous year. To put contract activity into context for the first quarter of 2022, we need to take a look at inventory. The lack of inventory is both consistent and persistent, and it is the reality that dominates that market.

For example, there were 30.2% fewer homes on the market in the City of Alexandria at the end of this March compared to last March. The paltry inventory is driving buyers (and their agents!) nuts.

The charts below break down 1st quarter contract activity for 2021 and 2022 by price and by property type. Alexandria has seen decreases across all property types, and the only price category with an increase was for homes priced more than $1.5 million.

  • Overall contract activity in the City of Alexandria decreased 8.9% in the 1st quarter of 2022 compared to the 1st quarter of 2021.
  • The number of detached homes, the smallest part of the City of Alexandria market, going under contract in the 1st quarter of 2022 decreased 24.8% compared to 2021.
  • Contract activity in the condo market decreased 5.5% and attached homes activity decreased 4.4%.

As we head into the spring market there is less than a half month’s supply of homes on the market in the City of Alexandria, and that bodes well for sellers. Opportunities for buyers will be out there, but success will require patience, preparation and persistence.

Note: Data derived from BrightMLS and is deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

If you would like a question answered in our weekly column or to set up an appointment with one of our Associates, please email: [email protected] or call 703-549-9292.

McEnearney Associates Realtors®, 109 S. Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. www.McEnearney.com Equal Housing Opportunity. #WeAreAlexandria

0 Comments

This week’s Q&A column is written by Darlene Duffett of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Darlene at 703-969-9015 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: Real estate jargon. Just what are you talking about?

Answer: Real estate agents use a lot of industry specific lingo. To the new home buyer, it may sound like we’re speaking a different language. It’s not unusual to have a client say, “what does that mean?”

I get it. If I was in your office, I probably wouldn’t have any idea what you were talking about either. A part of my job as a real estate agent is to make sure you understand all the vocabulary. If you are venturing into the home buying or selling process here are a few terms and acronyms that are helpful to know.

CMA: Comparative Market Analysis

We create a CMA by looking at recently sold properties and properties that are currently under contract which resemble the home you want to sell or buy. Similarity is key. We look at properties that are in the same or comparable neighborhood, have approximately the same square footage, number of beds and baths, and are in the same condition.

Contingency

A contingency imposes a condition or action of the transaction that must be met. Typical contingencies include financing, appraisal, home sale and home condition inspection. Each has a completion timeframe. In the current market, buyers are attempting to have as few contingencies as possible in order to have a more favorable offer.

EMD: Earnest Money Deposit

An earnest money deposit (EMD) is a deposit made by a buyer to an intermediary, typically the settlement company, to show his or her seriousness to follow through with the transaction. It represents the buyer’s good faith to purchase a home. The money sits in an escrow account until closing. At that time the money is applied to the buyer’s down payment and closing costs.

Escalation

An escalation addendum is added to a residential sales contract to automatically increase the offer price by a specific amount over a competing offer until it reaches the maximum price that the buyer is willing to pay for the property. This is only triggered if the seller receives other bona fide offers to purchase the property with terms acceptable to the seller. It can be a useful tool in this market.

MLS: Multiple Listing Service

An MLS is an organization that creates a private database to collect and distribute information about homes listed for sale by its members. Membership is not open to the public but is open to real estate brokers and agents who pay a fee for the service. Each MLS is local or regional. As of the publishing of this article, there is not an MLS that covers the entire country.

Pre-Offer Inspection or “Walk and Talk”

This refers to a modified inspection with the buyer as the note taker. It takes about an hour and can cost from $250 to $600 depending on the property. Doing a pre-offer “walk and talk” can help to avoid having a home inspection contingency. This makes the offer more favorable and will let you know of any issues with the home.

Read More

0 Comments

This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Lisa Groover of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Lisa at 703-919-4426 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: Now that the spring flowers are blooming, I am excited about freshening up my house. Do you have any suggestions that will make a big impact, but not break the bank?

Answer: Thank you for asking! I just refreshed my own home over the past year and am thrilled with the outcome! I am happy to share my examples and to make a few more suggestions.

Time To Go

If you are like me, you probably have furniture and accessories that you acquired from relatives, or your tastes have changed over the years and your favorite coffee table just doesn’t work anymore. I loved my purple leather sectional and had a hard time saying “goodbye”, but when my movers tossed it off the deck, I was even more excited about the new streamlined mid-century style sofa that I had on order.

Walk through your house and put blue tape on pieces that you could do without. You never know if your family members or friends will consider them a treasure.

Check out options for selling, auctioning, or consigning your nicer items. Think about the various non-profits in Alexandria that could use furniture for families moving into their first home, or thrift stores that donate the proceeds of a sale to deserving organizations. Donate or toss the rest.

Fix It

Does your tub need caulking? Hate those old lighting fixtures or recessed lights? Have you always wanted hardwood floors throughout the house? Does your deck need to be refinished? Make a list and give it to your contractor, handyman, or skilled family member to get it done.

In my case… I had the carpet ripped out of my top two floors and installed hardwood. Then my “floor guy” refinished all four levels for a gorgeous new look! My electrician replaced and added new LED recessed lights, a contemporary chandelier in the dining room and pendants in the kitchen. I was tired of the builder grade mirrors in my bathrooms and the hollow doors throughout the house.

I love my new lights and doors!

A new color palette and updated lighting can make your art really pop!

Paint It

Paint is the least expensive, most impactful and difficult decision to make for your refresh. I had an interior designer help me with my colors almost 24 years ago, and as much as I still liked them, I wanted a change! I discovered an expert who worked with me to create my new palette and I couldn’t be happier. The colors flow beautifully from room to room and have set a whole new stage for my update.

Read More

0 Comments
×

Subscribe to our mailing list