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This week’s Q&A column is written by Rebecca McCullough of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Rebecca at 571-384-0941 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: How do you feel about the fall real estate market?

Answer: New season, new beginnings…

For me, the day after Labor Day — even more than January 1st — represents new beginnings.

In real estate, it’s an excellent time to reflect on the year and consider where the next twelve months may go. I find this particularly so this year. We all know that since just after the global shut down for the pandemic, the real estate market has been on fire. Interest rates were lower than anyone has seen in history, buyer demand was through the roof, and a lack of inventory made for a wild ride these past two and a half years.

However, since late spring, we have definitely noticed a shift in the market. We’ve seen countless headlines wondering if the real estate market is “crashing.” This has been accompanied by countless predictions that housing prices will fall, and listings won’t sell. My take? Nope. Not today, and not likely in the near future, either.

Why no crash? What’s holding up the market?

Two of the three things I have written about in previous articles here have not changed: low inventory coupled with high buyer demand. The only thing that has changed most recently, of course, is interest rates. And while that has been significant (interest rates are more than 2% higher than just a few months ago), buyers still need and want homes.

So, it may surprise some, but we are still very much in a sellers’ market here in Northern Virginia. Yes, still! But there is good news for buyers. The absolute frenzy of the past couple of years appears to be behind us. We are simply back to the “normal” high buyer demand levels of 2018 and 2019.

The prices of homes in our area have gotten significantly higher in the past two years, and I anticipate that will continue to be true in the future. We may not see such increases in value, but I predict the prices will stay where they are, as inventory is still so low. We are still facing “less than a 1.5-month supply” for detached homes. For reference, a balanced market is a 3- to 6-month supply, and a buyer’s market is more than a 6-month supply.

So, while we may not see aggressive bidding like we did in the spring, sellers will list high and get their asking prices, or close to them. Recently, I listed a home that I was confident was listed fairly, but I did worry if buyers would engage at the list price. Did they ever — we had three offers. After quick negotiations, we got our asking price. My colleagues and I are seeing quite a bit of this activity. We are also seeing price reductions, but the reduced price would still be considered high compared to two years ago.

One consequence of higher pricing is fewer qualified buyers, so buyers are able to include contingencies. This was unheard of for hot homes earlier this year in the spring market. Those contingencies are usually for home inspection, financing, and appraisals.

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This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Hope Peele of The Peele Group and McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact The Peele Group at 703-244-6115 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: Whose advice should I listen to about the real estate market?

Answer: Because of whatever algorithm my iPhone has, I tend to get a lot of real estate articles showing up in my news feed. Personally, I like that because it keeps me up to date with whatever my clients might be reading at that time too.

Unfortunately, I usually cringe at the thought of my clients reading any of that and taking it seriously. Or even worse! Someone they love, and whose opinions they care about, might read it, and totally ruin their outlook on the market.

Don’t get me wrong, I want my clients to educate themselves and get opinions from friends and family. However, in my opinion, sometimes getting the wrong advice can be almost worse than getting no advice.

I heard someone say once (I can’t remember who, otherwise I’d credit them): Real estate is like the weather — it could be raining on one side of the street and completely dry on the other side. Same goes for regional trends. If you hear that the east coast is experiencing a drought, that doesn’t necessarily mean that you can count on no rain in D.C. I would still recommend checking the weather channel before leaving your umbrella at home.

Most people who are buying or selling a home will also talk to friends and family who’ve been there before. Older relatives love to give advice about how they did it and what they’d do differently, etc. Peers share experiences to give insight and inspiration, but sometimes also horror stories.

It’s important not to take any of this advice too seriously. In other words, with a grain of salt. I’m not saying that you should discount any of what you’re hearing, but all of it has context you should take into account.

If your uncle tells you that anyone who waives an inspection contingency is a sucker and your agent is telling you that you will continue to lose out on offers until you waive it, maybe you should consider weighing your agent’s experience a little bit higher.

There’s a reason that the real estate market is referred to as having “market trends” — they are just that, trends. Like skinny jeans vs. bell bottoms, what works at a certain time can vary vastly depending on what the trends are looking like at that specific time.

Considering how many factors influence the real estate market, especially in our area, it is important to look at the specific aspects of the market you are currently in. Since your Realtor works in the market full time, they will be able to keep you up to date so that you can navigate any type of market!

Hope Peele is a licensed real estate agent with McEnearney Associates, Inc. in Alexandria, Virginia. She grew up in Old Town and currently lives in Del Ray. As a partner with The Peele Group, Hope is dedicated to guiding her clients successfully through the many faceted process of buying or selling a home. Contact Hope at 703-244-6115.

If you would like a question answered in our weekly column or to set up an appointment with one of our Associates, please email: [email protected] or call 703-549-9292.

McEnearney Associates Realtors®, 109 S. Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. www.McEnearney.com Equal Housing Opportunity. #WeAreAlexandria

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This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Peter Crouch of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Peter at 703-244-4024 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: How does it feel after a downsize?

Answer: A few years ago, I downsized. We moved from a single-family home to a townhouse. The kids were out of college and the question was, do we need this large house. Plus, my business here at McEnearney Associates/Crouch Realty Group is all about downsizing, helping older folks transition and working with estates, so I wanted to practice what I preached.

The real final straw in making the decision was that, as I was mowing the lawn one day, a friend stopped by and asked me to go fishing. My reply was that I was busy and that I would take a rain check.

Later, it occurred to me that one of the things I had been looking forward to through the years of trekking to sports events, band concerts, art shows and the like, was indeed the time to go fishing. And I had passed it up to mow the lawn. Yes, the lawn was a source of pride and mowing was a source of exercise, but was it fulfilling? It was nowhere on my “bucket list,” so why spend that time on it? Sure, I could hire it out, but why even have a big lawn?

Some of the answers were so the kids would have a place to come home for a visit. So I could preserve some of the antiques of past generations handed down to me. So I could host gatherings of friends/family visiting the Metro Area. So we could be near friends whose kids hung out with ours.

Nothing, however, about refocusing on things I/we wanted to do. Instead, we downsized into a townhouse. We considered a condo, but still wanted a little yard.

How are we a few years later? The kids are here all the time. They do not miss the house — it is the family they want to be near. Out-of-town guests still use us as home base for tours. The Big Brown Furniture (BBF) of past generations no longer defines our decor. (We kept smaller reminders of our wonderful heritage). I am not consumed with maintenance of a big house for, essentially, diminishing returns. And I no longer own a lawnmower.

So, give it some thought and ask yourself:

  • Do you want family to come hang out with you or with your house?
  • Do you want to preserve the Museum of Past Generations or rather smaller mementos of them, plus add your style to your house?
  • Do you want to keep up with the maintenance, whether by yourself or contracted out?
  • Do you want to focus on the activities that bring you satisfaction or the unending chores?

We are happy to chat with anyone who is thinking about a downsize or transition — even if it is to confirm that you want to stay put. Or anyone who wants to go fishing, give me a call.

Pete Crouch is a Seniors Real Estate Specialist, which means he is well-versed in all aspects of moving as we age. His own downsize gave him tremendous insights into what is involved, from emotional matters to real estate considerations. Pete is a Board Member of At Home in Alexandria (AHA), our local Senior Village, and was the 2018 National Recipient of the “Outstanding Service Award” by the National Association of Realtors for his work with Senior Moves. Text 703-244-4024 or email [email protected] for a copy of his Downsize Alexandria! Booklet about living more simply in Greater Alexandria.

If you would like a question answered in our weekly column or to set up an appointment with one of our Associates, please email: [email protected] or call 703-549-9292.

McEnearney Associates Realtors®, 109 S. Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. www.McEnearney.com Equal Housing Opportunity. #WeAreAlexandria

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This week’s Q&A column is written by Darlene Duffett of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Darlene at 703-969-9015 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: How can I increase my home’s value before I put it on the market?

Answer: I’m asked this question all the time.

There are so many things that can be done to a property to increase its value prior to sale.

Here are 10 things that will make a big difference to your home’s value without hiring a contractor to knock down walls or expand the property.

1. Touch Up Your Curb Appeal and Landscaping

First impressions are everything. Potential homebuyers will make immediate, first impression notes as they drive up to your home. Approach your home from the street like a homebuyer. Take a fresh look at it. Do you have overgrown old bushes, weeds or unmanicured lawn? My top advice is to bring in a landscaping company to do a quick clean up and edging. You would be surprised how quickly a crew can get done what will take you an entire weekend.

Are you on a budget? Spending the weekend in the yard with the family can be an economical way to improve the appearance of your home. Trim the shrubs, mow the lawn and rake up any leaves. Make sure to edge all the sidewalks, beds and walkways. Clean up all the flower beds and add a new layer of mulch. Finish with a few flowerpots to add a pop of color by the front entrance.

2. Declutter and Depersonalize

The appearance of a larger room will increase value. Less is more when it comes to appearance and clutter. Walk through your home. Remove extra and oversized furniture to help rooms look more spacious. When you decrease the number of items in a room you visually increase the room’s square footage. Clean off all flat surfaces. Open blinds or add a mirror to a smaller room to visually extend the room. Always depersonalize so that the homebuyer can envision themselves living there.

3. Paint It!

One of the easiest and quickest ways to make a house shine is with a fresh neutral coat of paint. This is not the time to make a statement with the color of the year. Stick with something neutral. Hire a professional painting crew to put a fresh coat of paint on all walls. It is a quick way to freshen up each room and make them look clean and updated.

If you have a limited budget focus on the kitchen and bathrooms. Buyers will likely spend more time looking at them and will go a long way. Again, if you are a do-it-yourselfer make sure to cover all surfaces as you do not want to decrease the value with pain spots on the floors. For the exterior, follow your neighborhood’s trends to create some uniformity and sense of place.

4. Clean It

A clean home sets the stage for a potential buyer. Make sure that windows are professionally cleaned. It is worth every penny to have clean, streak free windows that let the natural light in. Vacuum all carpets and clean them if necessary. Mop all wood and tile floors. Scour all sinks, showers, tubs and toilets. Clean all kitchen appliances, wipe out the interior of all cabinets and shelving, wipe down all cabinets on the outside, and polish the counters and stainless-steel appliances.

If you are still living in your home, make sure to take out the garbage. You don’t want the smell of your last meal to be the first scent for the new homebuyer.

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This week’s Q&A column is written by Karisue Wyson, Director of Recruiting & Agent Support at McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article, contact Karisue at 703-615-0876 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: What is an ADU and can I add one to generate additional income?

Answer: Homeowners have been using their properties to earn additional income or expand their living options for as long as there have been shared living spaces.

Whether they are over-the-garage studios, garden or “English basement” apartments, in-law suites, “granny flats,” or stand-alone carriage houses, Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) offer passive income while also easing limited inventory in the rental market.

But what qualifies an ADU, how are they regulated and what should ADU-aspirers watch out for as they begin the process of expanding their property management?

Simply put, an ADU is a second residential area on a homeowner’s property. It can be detached from the main home or built within the primary as an attached but separate or walled-off living space for the privacy of the residents.

An ADU will have its own bedroom(s), kitchen and bath, and usually have a separate entrance, allowing residents to function independently of the main property.

As with most residential real estate, ADUs are subject to zoning regulations and homeowners can expect applications, permits, inspections and tax assessments when establishing or building an ADU (helpful local links are provided below). Homeowners should be sure to follow local guidelines and laws when establishing an ADU.

ADUs can require significant financial investment and can be as utilitarian or luxurious as desired, and homeowners should budget anywhere from $300-$500/SF or about $125k-$400K for renovations, excavations and construction. How an ADU will be used — for living, home office, working out, etc. — will determine how much space you need, what utilities are required, necessary parking, accessibility needs and other logistics.

Depending on zoning requirements and the size of the lot, ADUs can be as custom and expansive as “Tiny Homes,” new or pre-fab construction of completely independent homes with a very small footprint. More often in a dense metro area like ours where buildable land is scarce, ADUs are converted spaces, usually in basements or garages and can be creative challenges.

How the ADU is used is up to the homeowner and can become additional living space for family members or as an income-generating property for long- or short-term rentals. Pandemic living has shown us the ways the home is the center of our world and ADUs offer flexible family living, whether it be for multi-generational members co-existing under one roof, childcare or eldercare staff, age-in-place parents, work/school-from-home refuge, or an artistic escape.

Rentals, quickly becoming one of the fastest growing uses of ADUs, are subject to local regulations for short-term offerings (less than 6-months) like AirBnB or VRBO. For example, in Alexandria an ADU can’t have more than three people living in it and the ADU can’t be rented at the same time as the primary home. Homeowners should check their local jurisdiction to see if there are any grants or benefits for adding affordable rental units on their property.

One of the most promising, but hotly debated outcomes of the popularity and proliferation of ADUs is their impact on the local housing market. At a time when rental inventory is historically tight, ADUs allow homeowners to earn income while also alleviating rental pressure with affordable housing. Many people believe this is a win-win for communities — enriching homeowners at a time of rising inflation while also providing much needed independent rental inventory at a price range that is often non-existent in urban markets.

But detractors across the nation (including, currently, in Arlington) say that density housing, including ADUs, are crowding single-family neighborhoods and putting additional pressure on parking and utilities and lead to noise, crowding and increased taxes.

A decade ago, our local leaders were debating the value of ADUs, and the ensuing years have only increased the popularity and push for this type of supplemental housing. Local systems throughout the region have been updated and adapted to clarify qualifications, streamline applications and ensure consistency throughout the process, making ADUs an attractive option for homeowners with the space, budget and creativity to expand their homes and their real estate empire in the process.

For more information about ADUs, follow the links below and stay tuned for updates at our McEnearney Blog.

If you would like a question answered in our weekly column or to set up an appointment with one of our Associates, please email: [email protected] or call 703-549-9292.

McEnearney Associates Realtors®, 109 S. Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. www.McEnearney.com Equal Housing Opportunity. #WeAreAlexandria

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This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Ann Duff of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Ann at 703-965-8700 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: How can my happy life get any crazier?

Answer: Life comes at us fast, “where did the summer go” and suddenly you’ve been offered your dream job in a dream location! Wonderful news, yes, but what to do first? What do you need to do without delay? You’ve just picked up the phone and called me… here is what we talked about:

You say you want to sell for $9 billion dollars, that is a given. You want to have everything go as smoothly as possible, plus we need to get your home on the market right after Labor Day 2022.

I am coming over right away (and you are going to invite someone else — a cousin, friend, or co-worker to join us) to give us immediate impressions of the house with permission to spot “things” and to speak up reporting on — ratty shades, ugly draperies, lumpy carpeting, embarrassing artwork — and, of course, any stains, unwelcome scents, or weeds.

Let’s hurry to get a pre-sale home inspection scheduled! Those professional engineers which buyers rely upon are very helpful on the front end, too. At least you’ll know what to expect and can avert surprises by fixing the fixable now. Go ahead and schedule a handyman/painter for two weeks from now, just to make sure everything works and sparkles.

Open your iPhone and find past photos of the patio, back yard or balcony in bloom. We may need to edit Aunt Swizzie out of the shot (she is such a flamboyant presence) and not really a selling point.

Even then we may have to make MAGIC happen by invoking Climate Change for Good — changing grey skies to blue — with the help of my in-house photoshop magician to make all the difference.

Dreary, rainy day and voila, your house stands tall and looks its best.

As I’ve often written, professional photography is critically important, but sometimes extra help is needed. You agreed to clean and clear up as much as possible, even if you need to hire a POD storage unit now before heading out of town to give visual room to attics and basements.

Deep Fake for Good — boring empty rooms become beauties with virtual staging — my secret is to employ the inspiring difference of an Australian company I use which listens when I ask for either Contemporary or Traditional stylings to transform empty spaces into comfortable living areas.

Nice open space, but sterile — just add imagery.

Empty or sparse rooms: here I come with a car trunk full of treasures — artificial flowers, towels, lamps, and more to soften the edges and spark the imagination. Partial staging or using your own furniture will help grant universal appeal and warmth.

You asked if they will want your designer chandelier? I urged you to be careful to remove or swap out (with decent replacements) any items that are very dear to you and your family.

In July 2022’s New Sales Contract, bathroom mirrors now get special treatment, so don’t just take them off the wall on moving day — make the swap now or make it clear in the listing and contract that they aren’t staying. I have heard of stressful closings revolving around suddenly empty bathroom walls creating disappointed buyers.

Heads up — keep the interior easy for walking and the insurance paid up. Buyers have been known to go splat, head over tail, when an ottoman juts into the room. Pretend you are touring the house and walk through, looking up at the ceiling or out the windows. We all hope there isn’t a Lego block or pet to trip up your visitors.

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This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Hope Peele of The Peele Group and McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact The Peele Group at 703-244-6115 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: How much do cosmetic fixes cost?

Answer: This is a common concern for both buyers and sellers! Lately, my team and I have had lots of experience with getting homes show ready and with helping buyers who have purchased a home in need of a bit of TLC before move-in. While every situation is unique, there are some standard costs that we are seeing — which of course are subject to change — but knowing the numbers can help you put these costs into perspective.

As a seller, it’s normal to worry about the costs associated with getting your home ready for sale. We understand that it may seem as if the money could be wasted, especially if buyers want to move in and change things to their liking anyway. However, most buyers overestimate the costs involved in painting, replacing carpet, and other cosmetic fixes. Your final sale price will reflect those worries because buyers are less likely to compete for your listing if it’s viewed as a “fixer upper.”

As a buyer, it can seem daunting to have to spend even more money to make the home move-in ready. After saving up for years to come up with a down-payment and closing costs to buy your new home, the thought of having to spend a bunch of extra money to make a “fixer upper” move-in ready can be scary.

So, let’s talk about some real examples of recent work. This will give you have a better idea of just how expensive it really is to paint and spiff up a home — whether you’re buying or selling.

One of the first things that many people do to make a new home “theirs” is fresh paint! We recently had a home painted in South Arlington that was a bungalow with 1,209 square feet. The cost, including paint and labor, was $4,500. Another home that we are currently working on is in Old Town and it is historic with 1,182 square feet of character, lots of ornate woodwork and some walls and ceilings to repair. That paint quote was $5,800, due to the extra prep work.

Painting costs will also vary depending on whether you want to paint all the ceilings, closets, and woodwork, as we did in those two instances, but this is a good estimate for planning purposes.

Aside from the walls, floors are another concern for many moving into a new home. For some, a “worst case scenario” would be old, dirty carpet that needs to go away, but even hardwood floors can sometimes need some TLC or even replacement.

Raul Vasquez, owner of Federal Contracting, has worked with many of our sellers and buyers, and has recently given us some ballpark quotes for several different approaches to flooring. In a basic 20×20 family room, it would start at about $675 to replace wall-to-wall carpet. Nowadays, many are opting for luxury vinyl tiles (LVT) which is a nice option that looks like hardwood but is much easier to care for and maintain. For the same size room, you could install LVT instead of carpet starting around $2,500. Although more expensive initially, it may make sense long term.

If the existing hardwood is in relatively good shape but just needs to be refinished, it can get a little pricier. One recent home that we worked on had all the main level flooring refinished, which was just over 1,500 square feet, and this cost $5,250. Another option is a professional grade polish — this can be a great, lower-cost option that conditions and refreshes the wood to a lovely shine. Pricing for this will be significantly lower than refinishing but will depend on the condition of the wood.

Another big thing that many new homeowners don’t realize is that reglazing a bathtub is easy. Many tubs don’t need to be replaced, just reglazed and that is much cheaper! A standard bathtub reglazing costs about $400, whereas a new porcelain-enameled cast iron drop-in tub is running anywhere between $1,348 and $3,810 on the local HomeDepot site today, and that doesn’t even account for the installation work.

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This week’s Q&A column is written by Sallie Seiy of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Sallie at 703-798-4666 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: As a homeowner, how can I prepare my home for the fall?

Answer: Can you believe it’s already August?! While we are still in the hot, humidity of summer, the sounds of school bells and leaves falling are not too far off. Fall will come just as quickly as summer is fading.

With the change in seasons, there are new responsibilities as a homeowner. First step is to prepare.

Did you know Virginia’s 3-Day Sales Tax Holiday is coming up this weekend on Friday, August 5 until Sunday, August 7? Along with the traditional clothing, shoes and school supplies, you can also purchase emergency preparedness products and Energy Star™ and WaterSense™ products! Items like these could help you save money on your electricity and water bills or help in the event that a large snow or rainstorm knocks the power out or puts big tree branches down on your driveway.

A few of the products you can purchase this upcoming weekend that will benefit your home: generators, washing machines, chainsaws and accessories, shower heads, etc.

Around the house a few things you can do to prepare for the fall would be:

  • Power-wash your exterior: Wash away the mold and mildew that summer can leave behind.
  • Reseal your deck: This helps to prevent any cold moisture from penetrating your deck.
  • Clean out your gutters: Fall means leaves falling and clogging your gutters.
  • Schedule an HVAC fall tune up: Get on their calendars early in case there are repairs needed.
  • Hunt for any air leaks: If there are any drafts coming from windows or doors, go ahead and caulk them to help keep heating costs down.
  • Fireplace inspection: If you have one, get a chimney inspection prior to use!
  • Battery Checks: Make sure your carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide batteries are changed out.

The final check — as the temperatures cool off and the outdoor plants go dormant, make sure to remove hoses and winterize your outdoor hose bibs!

When you are ready to sell your current home or start searching for a new one, please give me a call!

As a fifth generation Realtor and the granddaughter of an architect and builder, Sallie has deep roots in real estate. She is passionate for the charm, history, and architecture of Alexandria and its surrounding communities. If you would like more information on selling or buying in today’s complex market, contact Sallie today at 703-798-4666 or visit her website SallieSeiy.com.

If you would like a question answered in our weekly column or to set up an appointment with one of our Associates, please email: [email protected] or call 703-549-9292.

McEnearney Associates Realtors®, 109 S. Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. www.McEnearney.com Equal Housing Opportunity. #WeAreAlexandria

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This week’s Q&A column is sponsored and written by Lisa Groover of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant Alexandria market news, contact Lisa at 703-919-4426 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: What do real estate agents do when they are not out selling houses?

Answer: I am often asked what I do when I am not helping my clients buy or sell their homes. In addition to walking my dogs in Old Town, I love being involved in the community, not only socially, but in ways that help others.

I welcome the opportunity to share some of the experiences I have had this summer and invite you to two upcoming events.

Old Town VillageFood Drive For ALIVE!

Founded in 1969, ALIVE! is the oldest and largest private safety net in the City of Alexandria dedicated to fighting poverty and hunger.

The summer months of July and August are the time of year when we can really help.

Special thanks to everyone who participated in the food drive on July 16th in Old Town Village. With your generous donations, we collected 639 pounds of all sorts of food! Executive Director Jenn Ayers said, “Thank you for your commitment to ALIVE! and the people we serve.”

She noted that our drive will be feeding 512 Alexandria residents in need.

K9 Yappy Hour Hosted by The Alexandria Police Foundation

As you know, I am a big dog lover, so when I heard about the K9 Yappy Hour being held in the courtyard at The Alexandrian Hotel, I wanted to be involved.

Funds raised at the event on May 19th benefited the well-being of Alexandria’s active and retired police dogs.

According to The Alexandria Police Foundation’s Executive Director, Ginny Hill-Obranovich, it had been several years since a Yappy Hour was held, and that she was happy to see so many people enjoying an evening with their dogs.

It was terrific seeing so many of my friends, clients, neighbors, colleagues and your dogs.

Thank you for your support of the Alexandria Police Dogs!

Upcoming Clothing and Housewares Drive to Save a Heart!

Saturday, August 13 | 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Old Town Village Roundhouse | 343 S. Fayette Street, Alexandria, VA 22314

The Twig, the Junior Auxiliary of Inova Alexandria Hospital, has pledged another $1 million towards the renovation of the hospital’s Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit.

You can help achieve their goal by donating the following items:

  • Gently worn apparel for men, women and teens
  • Housewares (kitchen utensils, pots and pans, vases, dishes, tools)
  • Decorative accessories (artwork, frames, lamps — no bedding or pillows)
  • Handbags, shoes, ties, hats, jewelry
  • Books, luggage and so much more!

All items will be sold at affordable prices at The TWIG Thrift Shop (Open September through mid-June at 106 N Columbus Street). Proceeds will be donated to Inova Alexandria Hospital. *Receipts will be provided

Upcoming Shop & Support to Benefit the Unmet Medical Needs in Alexandria

Wednesday, August 10 | Sara Campbell | 320 Prince Street, Alexandria, VA 22314

10 a.m.-7 p.m. | Sips & Bites from 4-7 p.m.

Enjoy first pick on deeply discounted Sidewalk Sale Deals and 10% off all full priced lady’s apparel and accessories. Sara Campbell boutique will donate 10% of all sales to the Board of Lady Managers, a humanitarian organization serving the unmet medical needs in Alexandria.

Stop by anytime during the day, or for lovely refreshments from 4-7 p.m. Don’t forget to mention the Board of Lady Managers!

I love living and working in Alexandria, where I am dedicated to giving back to our wonderful community. Please join me on August 10th and/or August 13th at one of the upcoming events.

Lisa Groover is a licensed real estate agent with McEnearney Associates, Inc. in Old Town Alexandria, VA. As an active member of the community since 1989, Lisa specializes in Alexandria, and is thrilled to have the opportunity to work closely with her friends, neighbors, former clients and their referrals.

If you would like a question answered in our weekly column or to set up an appointment with one of our Associates, please email: [email protected] or call 703-549-9292.

McEnearney Associates Realtors®, 109 S. Pitt Street, Alexandria, VA 22314. www.McEnearney.com Equal Housing Opportunity. #WeAreAlexandria

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This week’s Q&A column is written by David Howell, Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer, of McEnearney Associates Realtors®, the leading real estate firm in Alexandria. To learn more about this article and relevant market news, contact David at 703-855-5089 or email [email protected]. You may also submit your questions to McEnearney Associates via email for response in future columns.

Question: How was the real estate market in the Fairfax County portions of Alexandria for the first half of 2022?

Answer: Earlier this month, we took an in-depth look at contract activity in the City of Alexandria for the first half of the year compared to the same months of the previous year. (Read more here.)

This week we will look at the data for the Fairfax County portions of Alexandria (which we will refer to as South Alexandria going forward) during the same time.

One of the main differences between the city and county is the mix of condos, townhomes and detached homes. The graph below looks at contracts for each area based on these property types. The number of attached homes (duplexes and townhomes) is similar, but condos are the largest segment of the more urban neighborhoods of the city, and detached homes are the primary segment of South Alexandria’s suburban housing stock.

The remaining charts are concerned only with South Alexandria. To put contract activity into context for the first half of 2022, we will first look at month-end inventory and the number of new listings coming on the market year-to-date.

  • Month-End Inventory: At the end of June, there were 7% fewer homes on the market in South Alexandria compared to last June. (The City of Alexandria has seen a decrease of 28.0%.)
  • New Listings by Month: With the exception of February, so far this year the number of new listings coming on the market each month was down. Year-to-date, the number of new listings has decreased 8.5%.

Read More

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