Alexandria, VA

TikTok captures promotion for first Hispanic Alexandria Fire Department battalion chief — “‘Hi dad, it’s Nicholle,’ the voice said before listing all the other people in the room. ‘It is my honor to announce your promotion to battalion chief.'” [7News]

Emergency alert at 10 a.m. announcing 16+ eligibility for COVID-19 vaccine — “On Monday, April 19, around 10 a.m., #Virginia will be issuing a Wireless Emergency Alert System message alerting everyone 16+ that they are now eligible to register for a #COVID19 vaccine under phase 2. More information: bit.ly/3mXUfTC #VaccinateVA” [Twitter]

Police honor good samaritan who identified crash suspect — “The Alexandria Police Department honored a man and his family with the Chief of Police Award on Tuesday, April 13, 2021, for their assistance in a deadly pedestrian crash from last year.” [Twitter]

DASHing Words in Motion Poetry Bus honors 10 Alexandria Poets, Poet Laureate — “On April 15, ten local poets were honored by the Alexandria Transit Company and The City of Alexandria Office of the Arts for their poetry submissions. Their winning submissions are posted inside each bus of the entire DASH bus fleet and on the Office of Arts website.” [Zebra]

Today’s weather — “Considerable clouds early. Some decrease in clouds later in the day. Slight chance of a rain shower. High 68F. Winds WNW at 5 to 10 mph… Clear (in the evening). Low 47F. Winds light and variable.” [Weather.com]

New job: Group fitness instructor — “This is an exciting opportunity for the right person to be an inspiring member of our team and help us to continue to share the Row House brand and experience to all people, everywhere. Coaches are hired as employees (not independent contractors) as we invest in your development and growth as a rowing-based fitness professional.” [Indeed]

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It was another busy week in Alexandria. Here are some of the highlights.

This week, ALXnow profiled Mayor Justin Wilson and his opponent, former Mayor Allison Silberberg. The pair are facing off in the June 8 Democratic primary, and have vastly different ideas on city governance.

Alexandria Police released its 2020 crime data this week, revealing a 19% increase in Part 1 crime and 15% reduction in Nuisance crimes. ALXnow also reported a number of noteworthy crime stories, including the release of a video showing a chase suspect who died after his arrest in D.C. on April 12, and the indictment of a West End murder suspect.

This week also brought the unbelievable story of locals chasing down suspected shoplifters in Del Ray.

On the vaccine front, the Alexandria Health Department paused Johnson & Johnson vaccinations, following new concerns about potential side effects.

In school news, Alexandria City Public Schools will shift to three feet distancing in classrooms on April 26. Additionally, the School Board has started a conversation on reducing the number of members from nine to six.

Important stories

Top stories

  1. BREAKING: ‘Alexandria City High School’ chosen as replacement name for T.C. Williams High School
  2. JUST IN: Dr. Stephen Haering suddenly retires as director of Alexandria Health Department
  3. Southern Towers residents nervous as landlord steps up eviction proceedings
  4. Man stabbed at Old Town intersection
  5. NEW: Locals chase down suspected shoplifters in Del Ray
  6. JUST IN: T.C. Williams JV football team walks off field after alleged racial slur, spitting incident
  7. Man faces 10 years for DWI in horrific West End crash in Safeway parking lot
  8. Planning Commission approves controversial subdivision, plants potential loophole for future denial
  9. JUST IN: Video released of police arresting chase suspect who died in D.C.
  10. JUST IN: Six Alexandria Police officers put on administrative duties after chase suspect dies
  11. JUST IN: West End murder suspect faces life plus 13 years in prison

Have a safe weekend!

Photo via ACPS/Facebook

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A 23-year-old Washington, D.C. man faces at least two years in prison for allegedly breaking into two Alexandria pharmacies late last year.

The suspect will go to court April 28  on two counts of entering a structure to commit larceny and stealing more than $1,000 from the Walgreens at 1517 Mount Vernon Avenue in Del Ray on Dec. 8, 2020, and the MedPlus pharmacy at 5130 Duke Street in the West End, on Dec. 18.

Alexandria Police identified the suspect via security footage. The suspect was seen with an unidentified man allegedly stealing narcotics and then getting into a dark-colored Dodge Charge in the parking lot.

The suspect was not arrested after the discovery.

Instead, police placed a GPS tracker on the Dodge Charger and 10 days later discovered that it was parked in front of the MedPlus pharmacy at the same time that it was being robbed of narcotics, according to a search warrant affidavit.

APD, in coordination with the Metropolitan Police Department, caught up with the suspect at his home in northeast D.C. He was arrested on Jan. 26, and remains in the city jail.

There, officers found “narcotics listed as stolen by employees of both MedPlus and Walgreens,” according to police.

Walgreens and MedPlus photos via Google Maps

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A 34-year-old Arlington man was charged with distributing methamphetamine after reporting to police that he was the victim of an armed robbery in his fifth floor room at the Embassy Suites in Old Town.

On March 24, at around 7:15 a.m., Alexandria Police responded to a 911 call and met the suspect in the lobby. He told police that he’d just been robbed of money by a man with a knife in his room. He also said that a backpack belonging to a friend of his was stolen.

The officer asked if there was anything illegal in the room, and the suspect reportedly said, “There is some meth in the room, but it’s for personal use,” according to a police search warrant affidavit.

In the room, the officer found a clear bag, inside of which was a glass pipe. The officer asked the suspect what the pipe was for, and he reportedly said it was for smoking methamphetamine.

Later that day, officers searched the room and, in the safe, found 144 grams of suspected methamphetamine, marijuana and thousands of dollars. They also found digital scales, empty plastic bags and “numerous” syringes in a desk drawer, “one of which contained an unknown suspected narcotic liquid while the others appeared to be empty,” according to police.

The suspect was booked and released later that day on his own recognizance. The man suspected of robbing him at knifepoint was not arrested.

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Just Listed in Alexandria

Just Listed highlights Alexandria City properties that came on the market within the past week. This feature  is sponsored by the Jen Walker Team (Licensed in VA) of McEnearney Associates Realtors®. 

Welcome Back!

Jen Walker here with The Jen Walker Team! We are a real estate group based out of Alexandria, Virginia. I, along with my two rock-star team members, Sue Kovalsky and Micki MacNaughton, have more than 35 years of experience in real estate and sold over $103 million in 2019.

Join Us — Saturday, April 17 at 12 p.m. we will be going live on our Instagram featuring 8 E Chapman in picturesque Rosemont Park! This 2 bedroom, 2.5 bathroom, semi-detached home lives large and open featuring soaring ceilings and tons of natural light. A welcoming front porch greets you as you enter into the formal living room adorned with custom built-ins and clever storage. Continue into the great room where you’ll find the true heart of the home — including a half bath! The open kitchen features gas cooking, granite countertops with a peninsula, and great storage. Sit in the family room and enjoy the wood-burning fireplace (surrounded by built-ins) in the winter or hang out with the porch doors open during those perfect spring and fall evenings!

The upper level features a large primary bedroom with chic grasscloth wallpaper, great natural light and an Elfa closet system to maximize storage. A second bedroom and updated bathroom round out this level. The lower level features a bright rec room perfect for a playroom, office, or guest space. Conveniently, there is also a full bathroom on this floor, plus a spacious utility room equipped with a washer/gas dryer, ample storage, and new HVAC in September 2020! Don’t miss the well-manicured outdoor gardens and 3 car stamped concrete driveway! 8 E Chapman Street is perfectly situated near two Metro stations, two blocks to Maury Elementary, walkable to George Washington Middle School, shops and restaurants in Del Ray and Old Town, and more!

Welcome Home!

8 E Chapman Street, Alexandria, VA 22301The Jen Walker Team

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Nuisance crimes fell nearly 15% last year in Alexandria, and it’s largely due to the decriminalization of marijuana and the COVID-19 pandemic, according to police.

On Friday, the Alexandria Police Department released its stats on Nuisance crimes, which are “unreasonable and unlawful use of property, which causes inconvenience or damage to others.” They include destruction of property/vandalism incidents, drug offenses and disorderly conduct.

“The Covid-19 pandemic and the decriminalization of marijuana impacted nuisance crimes in 2020,” said Police Chief Michael Brown in a statement. “Nightlife activities were largely shutdown or restricted starting in mid-March, which impacted nuisance crimes involving alcohol.”

Earlier this month, police also revealed a 19% increase in Part 1 crime (crimes against people) in 2020 versus 2019.

As for Nuisance crimes, there was a 28% increase in destruction of property/vandalism calls for service, while public drunkenness fell 28%, driving under the influence fell nearly 40%, and liquor law violations dropped 54%.

There was also a 38% decline in drug and narcotic offenses. Marijuana was decriminalized last July, and since then anyone caught with up to once ounce is issued a $25 civil fine.

Below are the 2020 and 2019 Nuisance crime stats for Alexandria:

2020 Part 2 Nuisance Crimes Chart

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It’s no secret that Del Ray loves its dogs, and next month a new mural will be unveiled in their honor.

For the last month, local artist Patrick Kirwin has been working on the “Dogs Of Del Ray” mural, which is on the north side of Stomping Ground, facing the Pat Miller Neighborhood Square in the heart of Del Ray.

“It’ll last forever, or as long as the siding lasts,” Krwin said. “The trick is balancing the eyes, getting them right according to the axis on the head gives them their personality.”

Del Ray is full of personalities, like Dodger, Olive, Sadie and Aspin. Sue Kovalsky’s dog, Barley, for instance, will walk right up and lean on strangers on Mount Vernon Avenue — just to get a friendly pet.

Pat Miller came up with the idea with neighbor Karen Johnson.

“Dogs bring a lot to Del Ray,” Miller said. “When you’re out walking your dog, you always stop and talk to the next person that has a dog, so you get to know the community. And the dogs start liking each other and they start like being together.”

Miller says that the waiting list for dog portraits is completely full, and that some of the paintings are from dogs who have passed on.

“It was a tear-jerker, a way to memorialize their dog,” she said. “And that’s important because dogs are all about love and fun.”

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Morning Notes

Alexandria health director reflects on sudden retirement, tenure with city — “When Dr. Stephen Haering, director of the Alexandria Health Department for the past 11 years, unexpectedly announced his retirement on April 9, he did so for what he called ‘deeply personal’ reasons. Haering, whose retirement was effective immediately according to a city news release, told the Times in an interview that his departure was ‘not associated with the pandemic response.'” [Alex Times]

Vaccination drive brings a dose of hope for restaurant workers — “More than 1,000 restaurant and small business employees have filed through the doors of the old Fireflies restaurant over the past few weeks with the same purpose: receiving COVID-19 vaccinations. The location’s current vacancy made this the perfect site to administer such a large number of shots, Bill Blackburn, restaurateur and co-owner of Homegrown Restaurant Group, said. Blackburn joined forces with community organizer Charlotte Hall and Scott Shaw of Alexandria Restaurant Partners – who donated the space – to orchestrate the Alexandria Restaurant Drive whereby restaurant workers could receive vaccinations in a streamlined way.” [Alex Times]

Bren Mar Park demolition project to begin — “Demolition work will begin at Bren Mar Park on Collier Lane and Edsall Road in Alexandria, Virginia, as the Fairfax County Park Authority (FCPA) removes a home on the property.” [Fairfax County]

Reimagined ‘Taste Of Old Town North’ to be held over 2 months — “The Reimagined Taste of Old Town North will start on April 21 and will continue through June 21. During the two-month period, residents can purchase a Taste Passport for $10 to use at participating businesses. These businesses will offer discounts to Passport holders.” [Patch]

Today’s weather — “Intervals of clouds and sunshine (during the day). High 63F. Winds WNW at 10 to 20 mph… A few clouds from time to time (in the evening). Low 44F. Winds NW at 10 to 20 mph.” [Weather.com]

New job: Taekwondo instructors and camp counselors — “Our growing company is currently seeking motivated and enthusiastic individuals who are GREAT with people to join our team at multiple locations. Our programs include martial arts classes for all ages, as well as After-school & Summer Camp programs for children 6-12 years old. Work hours tend to fall in the afternoons, evenings and Saturday mornings. This is a part-time position that can lead to a full-time position with excellent opportunity for advancement.” [Indeed]

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Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson doesn’t want to hold any other political office. He also wants to be elected at least once more in November, and in less than two months he’ll square off in a Democratic primary rematch against his political rival, former Mayor Allison Silberberg.

Wilson says the June 8 primary really isn’t about he and Silberberg, but more about the direction that the city wants to go. In fact, he never mentioned his opponent by name during a 45-minute conversation with ALXnow. He’s raised $90,000 to Silberberg’s $64,000, hired Henry Watkins (Sen. Adam Ebbin’s Chief of staff) as his campaign manager, and has a goal of knocking on more than 2,000 doors.

“We’re talking about the future of the city,” Wilson said. “I think what you’re going to hear me talk about in this election is policies designed to protect the city’s future, protect our residents and make sure that we build a more resilient city coming after this horrible shock of the last year.”

Still, Wilson — an admitted social media addict — has lately been posting about numerous 6-1 votes that went through during Silberberg’s tenure as Mayor. Wilson, who was vice mayor under Silberberg from 2016 to 2019, led most of Council’s opposition to the then-Mayor on such issues as development of the Silverado Memory Care facility, funding construction of MacArthur Elementary School, and approving The Spire affordable housing project. He does not mention Silberberg in the posts, only hinting that she made wrong decisions.

“If it’s unspoken, it’s gonna stay unspoken,” Wilson said. “I’m focusing on these efforts because they are benefiting our community.”

The 42-year-old Wilson is married with two children and lives in Del Ray. For his day job, he is a senior manager for Amtrak. He was elected in a special election to Council in 2007 after the resignation of then-Vice Mayor Andrew Macdonald. He lost reelection in 2009, was elected in 2012 and was elected as Vice Mayor in 2015. He then defeated Silberberg in the Democratic primary for mayor in 2018.

The last 13 months of the pandemic have brought historic change to Alexandria, and now Wilson wants to go back to in-person City Council meetings.

“I think we should be back already,” Wilson told ALXnow. “My colleagues (on Council) are uncomfortable, so it’ll be up to my colleagues to decide when we go back.”

Wilson said he will decide on a running for third term at the conclusion of his second.

“I have no desires for any other elected office,” Wilson told ALXnow. “This is the office that I wanted to serve in. This is the office that I suspect will be my last elected office.”

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(Updated on 4/16/21) As the city works towards a more inclusive portrayal of its history, part of that also involves an effort to move away from the “George Washington slept here” approach to history.

In a meeting of the Alexandria Historical Restoration and Preservation Commission meeting yesterday, the commission met with preservation architect Purvi Gandhi Irwin to discuss diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility in historic preservation. A focus of the discussion was reshaping views of historic preservation front the ground-up that accounts for viewpoints often neglected in preservation.

Irwin shared comments from the Dismantle Preservation Conference and the National Trust of Historic Preservation Annual Conference with the Commission.

“Different cultures look at history and time differently, but our guidelines do not,” Irwin said. “Indigenous peoples thought about history differently. It was more about oral traditions, less about hard facts, more about the culture and what came behind that. How can we broaden our criteria to encompass different cultures.”

Irwin said one of the main lessons of the conferences was that local historians will also have to continue to grapple with how to contextualize and memorialize events like marches, rallies and riots.

Michael Commisso, a commission member, said one of the cornerstones of historic preservation since many of the current laws were cemented in the 1960s has been highlighting iconic — mostly white — figures. In Alexandria specifically, there’s a legacy of historic preservation clashing with the Civil Rights movement.

“The preservation movement of the 1960s, well, it was the 1960s,” Commisso said. “The criteria is still relevant, but a lot of the stories that were being told and the history was white centric. We’re still very antiquated, even in the National Park Service, and we’re trying to do a better job telling those stories.”

Commisso said historic preservation would benefit from an approach that did more to look beyond the historical celebrities that may have lived at a place at one point in time. It’s a disinvestment that doesn’t come naturally to a city where it’s hard to shake a stick without hitting a property famous for its association with figures like George Washington or Robert E. Lee.

“With preservation, we get stuck in one time period, and we don’t tell the layers of history,” Commisso said. “We have to do a better job of making sure preservation is dynamic, and that there’s layers there. That it’s not just stuck in one event… That we’re telling a more inclusive story, a more holistic story, not just ‘Robert E. Lee was here.'”

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