Alexandria, VA

Hundreds of new cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Alexandria in the last week, as the number of positive cases has jumped to 5,366, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

That’s an increase of 356 cases since this time last week. There have also been 668 new cases reported in the city since Nov. 16.

No new deaths have been reported and the number of fatalities remains at 77.

There have also been 364 total hospitalizations since the onset of the pandemic in Alexandria. About one in 13 city residents who tested positive for the virus have been hospitalized, according to the Alexandria Health Department.

Across Virginia, there have been 4,062 deaths and there are or have been 237,835 cases of the virus. There have been 3.3 million PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests and the state’s seven-day positivity rate is 7.5%.

Demographics

There are or have been 2,806 women (with 38 deaths) and 2,539 men (with 39 deaths) in Alexandria with the virus. The only age groups that have not experienced a death so far are children and teenagers.

  • 80+    — 33 deaths, 150 cases
  • 70-79 — 21 deaths, 179 cases
  • 60-69 — Five deaths, 394 cases
  • 50-59 — 14 deaths, 644 cases
  • 40-49 — One death, 923 cases
  • 30-39 — Two deaths, 1,219 cases
  • 20-29 — One death, 1,079 cases
  • 10-19  — Zero deaths, 374 cases
  • 0-9     — Zero deaths, 382 cases

Latino residents have the most infections with 2,322 reported cases (with 13 deaths), white residents with 1,186 cases (40 deaths), and Black residents with 1,077 cases (19 deaths). There are 196 cases with Asian or Pacific Islander residents (and one death), 142 cases classified as “other” (with two deaths) and four native American cases (no deaths).

There have also been 43 outbreaks in the city, including 12 at long term care facilities, 24 in congregate settings, four in child care settings, one at a college, one in a K-12 setting and one at a correctional facility.

There have been 513 cases associated with the outbreaks. Health care workers also make up 353 positive COVID cases, according to VDH.

Testing Update

There have been 65,893 COVID tests administered in the city so far and 5,468 antibody tests. The city’s seven-day positivity rate is now at 6.3%.

  • Arlington County has 6,299 cases, 157 deaths and a 4.8% seven-day positivity rate
  • Fairfax County has 31,388 cases, 638 deaths and a 7.5% seven-day positivity rate
  • Loudoun County has 10,049 cases, 143 deaths and a 7.3% seven-day positivity rate

Need a test? Find out where tests are administered here.

Cases By ZIP Code

The areas of the city with the leading number of cases are the 22304, 22305 and 22312 ZIP codes, which include the West End and Arlandria, Potomac Yard and Potomac West neighborhoods.

Some of the areas share jurisdictions between Alexandria and Arlington and Fairfax Counties:

  • 22301 — 210 cases, 5,883 people tested (Estimated population 15,171)
  • 22302 — 604 cases, 10,426 people tested (Estimated population 20,238)
  • 22304 — 1,696 cases, 19,443 people tested (Estimated population 54,003)
  • 22305 — 1,025 cases, 7,664 people tested (Estimated population 16,095)
  • 22311 — 938 cases, 8,692 people tested (Estimated population 16,898)
  • 22312 — 1,333 cases, 11,059 people tested (Estimated population 6,901)
  • 22314 — 613 cases, 13,785 people tested (Estimated population 47,826)

Photo via CDC/Unsplash

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With a bit of luck, Alexandria Health Director Stephen Haering said the city could start to get its hands on a vaccine by December.

A limited supply of vaccine and a high public demand has led to national, state, and local plans on determining who gets the vaccine, when, and how. Haering outlined some of the plans for Alexandria at a City Council meeting last night.

“We will be required to vaccinate certain persons first,” Haering said. “Our current understanding is [to prioritize] healthcare workers in long-term care facilities and hospitals… and those persons who live in long term care facilities and congregate settings.”

Haering said other recipients of the first phase will be essential workers — like first responders and “workers that keep government working and society intact” — and adults at high risk — like those over 65-years old and those with underlying medical conditions.

“We’re looking at those first phases being available as early as sometime in December,” Haering said. “We don’t know exactly if that will come through Health Department or through pharmacies. Large pharmaceutical chains have an arrangement to vaccinate long term care facilities directly. State health will be involved with coordinating that. We’ve been coordinating and planning on helping with vaccination there in case that falls through.”

Haering said that accelerated testing and vaccine production has allowed for some quick turnaround distribution.

“To tell you the process here: what they are doing, and one of the reasons they’ve been able to fast track this vaccine, is to combined some of the phases they typically do sequentially they are doing simultaneously,” Haering said. “Phase 2 trials are typically done for safety, and phase 3 is for safety and effectiveness, and they’re able to combine those. During phase 3 they actually start producing the vaccine. Typically a company would not do that because of the financial risk; you want to make sure it’s effective before you start producing it.”

Haering said the 90% effectiveness shown in the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines is promising. If both vaccines come to Alexandria, Haering said it will be important for those who get one vaccine to continue their booster shots with the same program. The Health Department is looking into putting together colored cards or other memory tools to help locals remember which shot they started with.

The vaccine can’t come soon enough for Alexandria, where cases are on the rise again.

“Our seven day moving average is over 46,” Haering said. “It was 47 or so at the end of April and in May. This is the highest it’s been since then. Our seven day moving average was in the teens in July through November, but it’s been going up statewide and nationally.”

Haering said hospitalizations are on the rise as well. Fatalities have not increased substantially, but Haering said the concern is that those could follow the increase in cases after two to four weeks. Of particular concern is the increase of cases in long-term care facilities, where the majority of the city’s deaths have been.

Though a vaccine could be on the horizon, in the meantime, Haering reiterated earlier pleas to city residents not to travel or host large gatherings for the holidays.

Staff photo by James Cullum

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With COVID-19 cases on the rise and the holiday travel season upon us, the Alexandria School Board on Monday approved a recommendation by Superintendent Gregory Hutchings, Jr. to delay an in-person plan bringing students back to school until January 2021.

Specifically, the move delays bringing back kindergarten through fifth graders with disabilities who receive self-contained Language Arts and Math, which was planned for Nov. 30, and middle schoolers in the citywide special education program in December. No new set dates were presented, and Hutchings told the Board on Monday that he is following the advice of the Alexandria Health Department and does not want to act impulsively.

“This global pandemic is not getting better,” Hutchings said. “We could be entering the most deadly phase of this pandemic, with all the travel that’s happening right now in Thanksgiving, as well as the travel that’s going to happen over the winter break.”

COVID-19 cases in Alexandria reached 5,051 on Tuesday, an increase of 41 cases since the previous day. The rise in cases is similar to what was seen in April and May, according to Alexandria Health Department Director Dr. Stephen Haering.

“We’re seeing increases across the board,” Haering said. “It’s an all age groups. This department, the city, I think everybody is really focused on reducing the transmission in order to prevent this from affecting our most vulnerable population — our elderly and those with underlying conditions that can put them at severe risk.”

ACPS staff also presented the board with results from its intent to return form, which was completed by 100% of ACPS employees. Out of the 2,601 respondents, approximately 55% of staff are able to return to work on-site at this time, while the remaining 45% of staff are impacted by COVID-related concerns.

Earlier this month, staffing issues kept Alexandria City Public Schools from expanding in-person learning for students with disabilities in grades 3-5 and who are in the citywide Special Education program.

The school system is currently evaluating several learning models for the future, including “concurrent teaching,” which would allow in-person and virtual classes to be held at the same time. If a teacher is not able to return under this model, they could still appear via video from home, while an adult supervises the classroom.

“The teaching will still occur from from that instructor, regardless of where the teacher is so they can be at home,” Hutchings said.

The School Board approved Hutchings’ plan to bring back in-person schooling last month. Staff reported that they are still working on bringing back kids to school, although ACPS presented no new timeline. The previous timeline is below.

  • November 30: Expand to include Students with Disabilities in grades K-5  instruction who opt into in-person learning
  • December 2020: Expand to include Students with Disabilities in grades 6-8 who are enrolled in the Citywide Special Education program who opt into in-person learning
  • January 2021: Expand to include all remaining students in grades PreK-5 who opt into in-person learning
  • February 2021: Expand to include all remaining students in grades 6-8 who opt into in-person learning
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Morning Notes

Alexandria Library Offers New Online Learning Tool — “During this time of school closures, expanded online learning, and social distancing recommendations, access to premium research tools that provide access to information from reliable sources is important. Alexandria Library Offers Online Resource Tool EZProxy to make access to these resources easier to use.” [Zebra]

Southern Living Profiles Alexandria at Christmas — “Although it may look the part, Alexandria, Virginia, is not the kind of Hallmark-movie small town where all the locals grew up together and you’ll undoubtedly run into your high school sweetheart while picking up a fresh baguette at the neighborhood bakery. The community here is tight-knit, but anyone can join.” [Southern Living]

Coronavirus Spike Leads to New Restrictions — “In restaurants, on-site sale and consumption of alcohol must end at 10 p.m., and the restaurants must close by midnight. Parties of more than 25 may not be seated or served, and customers must be served at tables 6 feet apart (and not at bar seating). Masks must be worn at all times when not drinking or eating.” [Alexandria Gazette]

Animal Welfare League of Alexandria Seeking Care Technician — “Responsible for daily cleaning and feeding of the animals at the animal shelter and other associated tasks. Weekend work will be required; Saturday or Sunday availability is required. This is a part-time Temporary position.” [Paylocity]

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The 45th Annual Turkey Trot and Food Drive for ALIVE! started virtually on Saturday, and the nonprofit has set up food collection points all over the city through November 29.

“We have given away 1.1 million pounds of food since the pandemic began,” ALIVE! Executive Director Jennifer Ayers told ALXnow. “The food need continues to grow. The need is still there and we need all the food and financial support we can get to continue to do what we have to do.”

The five mile race is traditionally attended by thousands. Registration costs $10 for children, $20 for ages 13-20, and $25 for everyone else.

“The 2020 Turkey Trot will be a little different from past years,” notes the Turkey Trot website. “First off, this year will be a virtual event, and you will be able to submit a time from any 5 mile run you complete between November 21 and November 29, 2020.”

Donations are already piling up at distribution points.

“Del Ray, as always, we’re blown away by your generosity,” Visit Del Ray said in a Facebook post. “Already, you’ve FILLED the sidewalk in front of  The Dog Store for our food drive for ALIVE — and this is just one of our six drop-off locations!”

This year ALIVE! needs the following: 

  • One-pound bags of rice
  • One-pound bags of dried beans
  • Macaroni and cheese boxes
  • Canned vegetable, soup and fruit (14-15 oz.)
  • Canned tuna or canned chicken
  • Baking mix, such as Bisquick (5-7 oz.)
  • Peanut butter

The food can be dropped at these locations:

  • Old Town North Farmers’ Market (Thursday from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m.)
  • Del Ray Psych & Wellness
  • Lena’s Wood-Fired Pizza & Tap
  • Del Ray Farmers’ Market (Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon)
  • The Dog Store
  • Waxing The City
  • The front porches of 403 E. Custis Avenue and 110 E. Del Ray Avenue

Incidentally, the first Alexandria Turkey Trot in 1975 had 244 participants, and was won by Jack Mehurin in 25 minutes and seven seconds. Last year’s race had 4,965 entries and was won by 23-year-old Ryan Forsyth in 23 minutes and 34 seconds.

There’s more than one way to support ALIVE!, like the first annual Turkey Squat at T.C. Williams High School.

Photo via Visit Del Ray/Facebook

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An Alexandria man in his 30s is the latest victim of COVID-19, as the number of cases in the city has ballooned over the past week.

The death count from the virus now stands at 77 in Alexandria.

There are or have been 5,010 cases of COVID-19 in Alexandria since the first case was reported in March, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

That’s an increase of 312 cases since Nov. 16. Mayor Justin Wilson tweeted that the city has not seen such an increase of cases since May.

There have also been 348 total hospitalizations since the onset of the pandemic in Alexandria. About one in 13 city residents who tested positive for the virus have been hospitalized, according to the Alexandria Health Department.

The city is also advising residents to stay home this Thanksgiving, and on Saturday the annual Christmas Tree lighting at Market Square was celebrated virtually.

According to the city:

The best ways to stop the spread of COVID-19 remain wearing a mask in public, maintaining at least 6 feet of distance from others, and frequently washing your hands or carrying and using hand sanitizer with at least 60% ethyl alcohol. Help your loved ones and neighbors by answering a call from AHD if identified as a close contact of someone who tests positive for COVID-19, and download the Virginia Department of Health’s COVIDWISE app to be quickly and anonymously notified of likely exposure to the virus.

Across Virginia, there have been 3,942 deaths and there are or have been 221,038 cases of the virus. There have been 3.2 million PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests and the state’s seven-day positivity rate is 7.2%.

Demographics

There are or have been 2,603 women (with 38 deaths) and 2,394 men (with 39 deaths) in Alexandria with the virus. The only age groups that have not experienced a death so far are children and teenagers.

  • 80+    — 33 deaths, 140 cases
  • 70-79 — 21 deaths, 163 cases
  • 60-69 — Five deaths, 371 cases
  • 50-59 — 14 deaths, 606 cases
  • 40-49 — One death, 859 cases
  • 30-39 — Two deaths, 1,140 cases
  • 20-29 — One death, 1,011 cases
  • 10-19  — Zero deaths, 342 cases
  • 0-9     — Zero deaths, 361 cases

Latino residents have the most infections with 2,191 reported cases (with 13 deaths), white residents with 1,089 cases (40 deaths), and Black residents with 1,025 cases (19 deaths). There are 178 cases with Asian or Pacific Islander residents (and one death), 133 cases classified as “other” (with two deaths) and four native American cases (no deaths).

There have also been 41 outbreaks in the city, including 12 at long term care facilities, 22 in congregate settings, four in child care settings, one at a college, one in a K-12 setting and one at a correctional facility.

There have been 505 cases associated with the outbreaks. Health care workers also make up 336 positive COVID cases, according to VDH.

Testing Update

There have been 61,582 COVID tests administered in the city so far and 5,966 antibody tests. The city’s seven-day positivity rate is now at 6%.

  • Arlington County has 5,856 cases, 157 deaths and a 7.1% seven-day positivity rate
  • Fairfax County has 29,089 cases, 629 deaths and a 8.3% seven-day positivity rate
  • Loudoun County has 9,345 cases, 139 deaths and a 8% seven-day positivity rate

Need a test? Inova is now offering vehicle-side and walk-in testing services for diagnosing flu and COVID-19, at the Victory Center parking lot (5001 Eisenhower Avenue).

Cases By ZIP Code

The areas of the city with the leading number of cases are the 22304, 22305 and 22312 ZIP codes, which include the West End and Arlandria, Potomac Yard and Potomac West neighborhoods.

Some of the areas share jurisdictions between Alexandria and Arlington and Fairfax Counties:

  • 22301 — 193 cases, 5,393 people tested (Estimated population 15,171)
  • 22302 — 557 cases, 9,712 people tested (Estimated population 20,238)
  • 22304 — 1,573 cases, 18,245 people tested (Estimated population 54,003)
  • 22305 — 989 cases, 7,183 people tested (Estimated population 16,095)
  • 22311 — 869 cases, 8,295 people tested (Estimated population 16,898)
  • 22312 — 1,260 cases, 10,424 people tested (Estimated population 6,901)
  • 22314 — 570 cases, 12,754 people tested (Estimated population 47,826)

Photo via CDC/Unsplash

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Morning Notes

City’s Guidance for Students Returning Home — “Students and staff should minimize their interactions with others as much as possible in the 14 days before leaving the IHE. Students and staff should also minimize the risk of exposure during travel home. Traveling alone in a private vehicle is the safest option. Students and staff who are unable to limit interactions with others at the IHE may consider quarantining themselves for 14 days after they arrive home.” [City of Alexandria]

Killer ESP Owner Denies Allegations by Quitting Staff — “Presented with some of the specific accusations against him regarding sexual harassment and the shop’s cleanliness, Shelton said, ‘This is outrageous. These lies are more absurd than the first go around.’ He said he would follow up with call, but later texted, ‘I’ve been advised by my attorneys to keep quiet.'” [Washingtonian]

City Urges Shelter During Cold for People Experiencing Homelessness — “The temperatures are dropping into the 20s tonight. The City’s Winter Shelter for individuals and families experiencing homelessness is open in two locations.” [Department of Community and Human Services]

Visit Alexandria Receives Grant to Expand Marketing of City’s Black History — “With the grant, Visit Alexandria will be able to produce videos and other media, including web content about Black-owned businesses and African American heritage sites. The plan is to highlight areas such as those that can be  seen during the Courageous Journey: Alexandria’s Black History Driving Tour and Duke Street Black History Trail.” [Zebra]

Staff photo by James Cullum

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Staffing issues kept Alexandria City Public Schools from expanding in-person learning this week, as young special education students were told Tuesday that they wouldn’t be able to go back to school as scheduled.

Families received a note from ACPS on Tuesday morning stating that school for students with disabilities in grades 3-5 and who are in the citywide Special Education program would need to stay home.

“Unfortunately, we were not able to return students in the (grades) 3-5 program as part of our targeted date of November 17, as the superintendent has said that all of our plans are contingent upon staffing and building capacity issues,” Terry Werner, the ACPS executive director of specialized instruction told parents in a Zoom call on Wednesday night. “We ran into some issues around staffing and we were not able to staff classes to bring students back from our next phase of students are scheduled to return on 30th.”

Werner spoke with concerned parents with the ACPS Special Education Advisory Committee. Parents said that communication issues were the biggest problem with the school system.

ACPS reopened schools to kindergarten through second graders with disabilities at  Jefferson-Houston PreK-8 International Baccalaureate School on November 5. There are more than 60 students eligible to return to in-person instruction, but the school system only brought in six students.

“Nowhere has there been communication that you know only six students were able out of 60 were able to return,” one parent said at the SEAC meeting. ” I think we have a communication problem with parents.”

Werner said she has been working 14 hour days on the phone trying to convince staff to come back, and that ACPS still plans to reopen schools to early childhood special education students in grades K-5 on Nov. 30.

Additionally, ACPS is still working with this general timeline:

  • November 30: Expand to include Students with Disabilities in grades K-5 who receive self-contained Language Arts and Math instruction who opt into in-person learning
  • December 2020: Expand to include Students with Disabilities in grades 6-8 who are enrolled in the Citywide Special Education program who opt into in-person learning
  • January 2021: Expand to include all remaining students in grades PreK-5 who opt into in-person learning
  • February 2021: Expand to include all remaining students in grades 6-8 who opt into in-person learning

“We’re still trying to determine if we have teachers,” Werner said. “I have people from one day to the next say, ‘I’m not coming back.'”

Werner said that families should receive a family choice form on Dec. 2, and that the results of a staff “Intent to Return” form will be available for discussion at a School Board meeting on Monday.

Photo via ACPS

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Scott Shaw equates the COVID-19 experience to a Greek tragedy with a beginning, middle and end. Right now, he says, we’re in the middle and looking forward to the third act — a period of eventual recovery.

Shaw, a partner with Alexandria Restaurant Partners, says that his company is similar to a lot of other restaurant companies looking at an uncertain winter on the horizon.

“The first act was reacting, getting through the summer, figuring out what your new business model looks like,” Shaw told ALXnow. “The second act is about getting through the winter, and then the third act will be recovering. The third act, let’s call it next March through next July, with the prospect of a vaccine on-hand, we can begin to return to normalcy and get back on track.”

Shaw and his staff have rehired 300 of the 500 employees the company had before the pandemic hit the city. ARP owns  Mia’s Italian KitchenVola’s Dockside GrillRiverside Taco CompanyJoe Theismann’s RestaurantPalette 22 and The Majestic. The company is currently looking to buy the former Charlie’s on the Avenue in Del Ray, and at Robinson Landing plans to open Ada’s On The River in January and BARCA Wine Bar and Pier in April.

ARP also recently installed air purification technology in all its restaurants. The Needlepoint Bipolar Ionization technology “virtually eliminates static COVID-19… achieving a 99.4% reduction within 30 minutes,” according to a company press release.

“We’re sort of navigating our way through the crisis,” Shaw said. “We’ve been careful with our money to make sure we have enough acorns for the winter.”

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The city’s partnership with Neighborhood Health is continuing this month with a series of four free COVID-19 testing events in the city.

Testing covers everyone above the age of two, though anyone under 18 requires a parent or guardian present. Bringing ID and insurance cards is encouraged, but not required.

Testing events are scheduled for:

  • Tuesday (Nov. 17) — 4-7 p.m. at Flora Krouse Casey Health Center (1200 N. Howard Street)
  • Thursday (Nov. 19) — 2:30-5:30 p.m. at Burke Branch Library (4701 Seminary Road)
  • Saturday (Nov. 21) —  11 a.m.-2 p.m. at William Ramsay Recreation Center (5650 Sanger Avenue)
  • Monday (Nov. 23) — 1:30-4:30 p.m. at Armistead Boothe Park (520 Cameron Station Blvd.)

“All community testing events are walk-up only (no appointment necessary),” the city said on its website. “Please expect to wait 30 minute to one hour from your time of arrival. In order to expedite the check-in process, you may pre-register by calling 703.647.6160, but please note that a pre-registration does not allow you to skip the line.”

nStaff photo by James Cullum

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There are or have been 4,698 cases of COVID-19 in Alexandria since the first case was reported in March, according to the Virginia Department of Health.

As case counts are growing throughout the region, Governor Ralph Northam’s newest restrictions also took effect Sunday night.

According to the City:

  • All public and private in-person indoor and outdoor gatherings must be limited to 25, down from the current 250
  • Everyone ages 5 and over will be required to wear masks in indoor public places, which is a decrease from the current age of 10
  • All essential retail businesses, including grocery stores and pharmacies, must adhere to state guidelines for physical distancing, requiring face masks and enhanced sanitization. Violations will now be enforceable by the Virginia Department of Health as Class 1 misdemeanors. AHD and the City anticipate additional guidance in the coming days.
  • Onsite alcohol sales, consumption and possession after 10 p.m. in any restaurant, dining establishment, food court, brewery, microbrewery, distillery, winery, or tasting room will be prohibited, and all such establishments must close by midnight. Bar areas of restaurants remain closed.

The City says that community transmission has shifted from low to moderate and there are now about 20 cases being reported every day.

“Regional hospitalizations, including the use of intensive care units and ventilators have also increased, suggesting that severe outcomes from COVID-19 persist despite the additional availability of testing and treatment options,” according to the city.

The death count from the virus remains unchanged at 76. Of the deaths, 98% have been residents above the age of 50.

Demographics

There are or have been 2,421 women (with 38 deaths) and 2,264 men (with 38 deaths) in Alexandria with the virus. The only age groups that have not experienced a death so far are children and teenagers.

  • 80+    — 33 deaths, 132 cases
  • 70-79 — 21 deaths, 156 cases
  • 60-69 — Five deaths, 350 cases
  • 50-59 — 14 deaths, 577 cases
  • 40-49 — One death, 810 cases
  • 30-39 — One death, 1,068 cases
  • 20-29 — One death, 932 cases
  • 10-19  — Zero deaths, 326 cases
  • 0-9     — Zero deaths, 334 cases

Latino residents have the most infections with 2,098 reported cases (with 13 deaths), white residents with 995 cases (40 deaths), and Black residents with 973 cases (19 deaths). There are 168 cases with Asian or Pacific Islander residents (and one death), 127 cases classified as “other” (with two deaths) and four native American cases.

There have also been 39 outbreaks in the city, including 12 at long term care facilities, 20 in congregate settings, four in child care settings, one at a college, one in a K-12 setting and one at a correctional facility.

There have been 467 cases associated with the outbreaks. Health care workers also make up 319 positive COVID cases, according to VDH.

Across Virginia, there have been 3,806 deaths and there are or have been 204,637 cases of the virus. There have been 2.9 million PCR (polymerase chain reaction) tests and the state’s seven-day positivity rate is 7.3%.

Testing Update

There have been 56,985 COVID tests administered in the city so far and 5,622 antibody tests. The city’s seven-day positivity rate is now at 5.1%.

  • Arlington County has 5,380 cases, 157 deaths and a 6.8% seven-day positivity rate
  • Fairfax County has 25,095 cases, 625 deaths and a 7.4% seven-day positivity rate
  • Loudoun County has 8,894 cases, 136 deaths and a 8.3% seven-day positivity rate

Need a test? Inova is now offering vehicle-side and walk-in testing services for diagnosing flu and COVID-19, at the Victory Center parking lot (5001 Eisenhower Avenue).

Cases By ZIP Code

The areas of the city with the leading number of cases are the 22304, 22305 and 22312 ZIP codes, which include the West End and Arlandria, Potomac Yard and Potomac West neighborhoods.

Some of the areas share jurisdictions between Alexandria and Arlington and Fairfax Counties:

  • 22301 — 179 cases, 4,932 people tested (Estimated population 15,171)
  • 22302 — 505 cases, 8,958 people tested (Estimated population 20,238)
  • 22304 — 1,478 cases, 16,965 people tested (Estimated population 54,003)
  • 22305 — 953 cases, 6,737 people tested (Estimated population 16,095)
  • 22311 — 820 cases, 7,809 people tested (Estimated population 16,898)
  • 22312 — 1,174 cases, 9,820 people tested (Estimated population 6,901)
  • 22314 — 534 cases, 11,584 people tested (Estimated population 47,826)

Photo via CDC/Unsplash

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What a week full of news in Alexandria.

With city offices closed due to Veterans Day on Wednesday, there were still a number of big stories.

For the second week in a row, our top story was on a fraudulent mailer that was sent out to a number of residents before election day. In the story, households with Joe Biden signs posted in front yards were sent letters with a Northern Virginia postage mark stating that Biden is a pedophile.

On Monday, we reported the third murder in the city this year. Yousef Tarek Omar, a 23-year-old Texas man, was shot to death in the West End on the afternoon of Saturday, Nov. 7. Police have released few details of the incident, except the victim’s name, the general time of the incident and that it occurred in the 4800 block of W. Braddock Road.

City Councilwoman Del Pepper announced on Tuesday that she will not seek reelection. Pepper has been on the Alexandria City Council since 1985.

“There’s really not much to say,” Pepper told ALXnow. “There’s a time for everything, and I just felt this was my time. I have enjoyed every minute that I’ve served on the City Council.”

We also covered the city’s recovery plan for parts of the city devastated by the pandemic, and it lists a number of programs and strategies for impacted residents and businesses.

On the coronavirus front, Alexandria surpassed 4,500 cases since the beginning of the pandemic in March. The number of fatalities is still 76, and Latino residents have the highest number of infections.

Additionally, our weekly poll got a lot of attention this week. This week we asked about Thanksgiving plans, and 60% of respondents said they were eating at home with their household, 30% are planning a small gathering with at least one guest, and 10% are planning a large gathering of family/friends.

  1. Alexandrians with Joe Biden Yard Signs Get Anonymous Letters Saying Biden is a Pedophile
  2. BREAKING: 23-Year-Old Shot to Death in City’s Third Murder of the Year
  3. ‘Clyde’s at Mark Center’ and Other Businesses for Sale in Alexandria
  4. Del Ray Staple Al’s Steak House for Sale After Owner’s Death
  5. The Waypoint at Fairlington to Break Ground Next Month
  6. Councilwoman Del Pepper Announces She’s Not Running for Reelection
  7. City Council to Consider Publishing Names of Delinquent Real Estate Taxpayers
  8. Upcoming Signage Plan Could Subtly Shape New Potomac Yard Skyline
  9. One Person Injured in West End Carjacking
  10. Alexandria Parents Start #OpenACPS Sign Campaign as School System Begins Partial Reopening
  11. Alexandria Surpasses 4,500 Cases of COVID-19, Counts Now Rising at Summer Pace

Have a safe weekend!

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