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Alexandria Police have released the identities of the two men killed on Insterstate 495 near Telegraph Road on May 12.

Abdellah Bougrine, 54, of Alexandria, and Driss Bougrine, 59, of Fairfax, died after being hit by vehicles after the 2016 Toyota Corolla they were driving stopped in the middle of the road. The two men got out of the Toyota and were then hit moments later by two vehicles.

“(The) male driver and male passenger exited the Toyota and were outside of it when the Toyota was struck moments later by a westbound 2000 Ford Ranger pickup truck,” Virginia State Police said in a release. “Both the driver and passenger were also struck. The impact of the crash caused the Toyota to run off the right side of the interstate and into the guardrail. The Ford came to rest on the left shoulder. A westbound 2008 Mazda Miata also struck one of the men.”

A GoFundMe campaign for the men raised $15,500, and is no longer accepting donations.

No charges have been filed, and the crash remains under investigation, according to VSP.

Via VDOT

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No one was injured after a car smashed through a front window of Great Harvest Bread (1711 Centre Plaza) in Fairlington Centre on Tuesday night (May 10).

The incident occurred at around 7 p.m., which is after the bakery is closed. An employee was working in a back room when a driver parked in front of the business put the car in drive instead of reverse and crashed into the building. No one was injured and the driver stayed at the scene.

“It was a new driver with their parent and they stayed at the scene,” shop owner Brad Hurst told ALXnow. “The repairs are going to take quite a while. I’ve gotten estimates from anywhere between a month to six months.”

It won’t be until next Tuesday (May 17) that the shop will have its bakery back up and running. In the meantime, Hurst and his family have been selling bread and cookies outside the shop, which they have owned for the last seven years.

“The community has been great,” Hurst said. “We’ve had a lot of customers come by express their support and to say they’re sorry. We’re just super thankful for the community and customers we have.”

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Mark Center Avenue and Seminary Road, image via Google Maps

A three-car crash has temporarily shut down part of Seminary Road near the intersection with N. Beauregard Street.

Alexandria Police said in a release that the crash has shut down westbound traffic on Seminary Road after Mark Center Avenue, between N. Beauregard Street and I-395.

Injuries from the crash are non-life-threatening, according to police

Image via Google Maps

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Crash reported at Seminary Road and Beauregard Street, image via Google Maps

Multiple cars, including at least one police vehicle, were involved in a crash this morning that resulted in multiple injuries.

The crash occurred sometime before 6 a.m. this morning at the intersection of Beauregard Street and Seminary Road.

Alexandria Police spokesman Marcel Bassett confirmed to ALXnow that a police vehicle was involved in the crash. Bassett said three cars were involved in the crash. There were at least two serious but non-life threatening injuries, and at least two people were taken to the hospital.

The street remained closed as of 9 a.m. as police continued their investigation.

Image via Google Maps

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A 35-year-old Richmond man faces serious charges after allegedly crashing a car into a pole in the 1000 block of Janneys Lane.

The incident occurred at around 10:45 p.m. on April 2 (Saturday), and the driver was found hiding from police two blocks away. The man told police that he was hiding because he was scared, according to a search warrant affidavit.

After denying that he took any alcohol or drugs, the man was searched and police seized several baggies with small, crystal shaped rocks, several syringes and plastic or glass pipes, according to a search warrant affidavit. The man was charged with hit and run, driving without a license, possession of Schedule I/II drugs, possession of Schedule III drugs and driving while intoxicated.

The suspect was released on April 4 on $7,000 unsecured bond and goes to court on April 18.

Via Google Maps

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Alexandria Police are still investigating a February 22 crash on Duke Street that resulted in the death of a driver and multiple injuries. No one has been arrested in connection to the crash, even though one of the drivers involved was found to be in possession of cocaine and  number of other suspected drugs.

“The crash resulted in one fatality, one critical injury, one serious injury, and two minor injuries,” APD said in a release. “Preliminary investigation suggests speed may have been a contributing factor in this incident.”

Five vehicles were involved in the crash, which occurred at around at around 11:50 p.m. One of the vehicles was a silver Toyota Rav4 with Florida plates, and under the driver’s seat police found a bag containing 92 grams of “white powder and white rock-like substances” which tested positive for cocaine, according to a search warrant.

Police also found “3.4 grams of a tan powder believed to be heroin, suspected PCP, three unknown pills and 0.7 grams of suspected marijuana,” according to the warrant.

Field tests for the suspected heroin and PCP were inconclusive and all of the substances have been sent to the Virginia Department of Forensic Science, according to the warrant.

“Currently no one has been charged with any crimes in connection to this incident,” APD Public Information Officer Marcel Bassett told ALXnow. “This investigation is still ongoing and will be thorough to ensure all parties involved are given their due process.”

Anyone with information on the crash is asked to call Officer Wesley Vitale at 703-746-6178, email [email protected] or call APD’s non-emergency number at 703-746-4444. Callers can remain anonymous.

Tips can be anonymous.

Map via Google Maps

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Update on 3/30/22 — The Alexandria Police Department said the driver was a 78-year-old local resident whose vehicle left the roadway and struck a 9-year-old girl on the sidewalk. Both driver and pedestrian were taken to Fairfax Hospital. The pedestrian had serious but non-life-threatening injuries and the driver was treated for minor injuries.

Earlier: A child was struck and seriously injured at an intersection just outside of Jefferson Houston Elementary School (200 block of North West Street).

According to a release from the Alexandria Police Department:

The 200 block of North West Street is closed to through traffic in response to a single-vehicle car crash involving a pedestrian. The pedestrian sustained serious but non-life-threatening injuries. APD is investigating the cause of the crash.

The crash was reported around 2:30 p.m., around the time the school lets out.

Alexandria Police public information officer Marcel Bassett confirmed that the pedestrian struck is a child. The driver stayed at the scene, and both the driver and victim were taken to a hospital.

A car crash near Alexandria City High School’s King Street campus briefly sent the school into “secure the building” status.

In an email, Alexandria City Public Schools (ACPS) said the school was put into secure status after three people ran towards the school post-crash.

“For the safety and security of our students and staff, the Alexandria City High School (ACHS) King Street Campus was briefly placed in ‘secure the building’ status today due to a car accident near the school that led to three subjects running in the direction of the school,” ACPS said in a release. “We have now returned to normal operations.”

The release said the “secure the building” status meant school operations continued inside the building but no one was allowed to enter or exit the school while it was being secured.

“The decision to secure the ACHS King Street campus was taken out of an abundance of caution, and the building was in this status for approximately 30 minutes,” ACPS said. “The Alexandria Police Department (APD) was on site assessing the situation, and we appreciate their quick response and collaboration with ACHS administration.”

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At a meeting on Saturday, the City Council unanimously approved an ordinance that will allow City Manager James Parajon to reduce speed limits in Alexandria as low as 15 miles per hour.

The ordinance, unanimously approved by the City Council, allows the City Manager to “reduce posted speed limits to less than 25 miles per hour, but not less than 15 miles per hour on any city street located in a business or residence district.”

“Speed kills,” said Mike Doyle, founding member of Alexandria Families for Safe Streets. “Even through the pandemic, the number of crashes and fatalities has risen. This ordinance of lowering speed limits will help. It’s not the final say, but it will help to reduce fatalities.”

At least in Alexandria, it isn’t entirely true that the number of crashes and fatalities have risen. A ten-year study of crashes in Alexandria found that while fatalities have remained fairly consistent, the overall number of crashes has declined on average.

Doyle said that while statistics highlight fatalities, serious injuries can leave people reliant on their families for help.

“One way to improve safety is to reduce speed limits,” Doyle said. “Drivers will slow down, save themselves from being in a crash, and more importantly will save lives.”

Nicole Radshaw, who was hit by a car on Seminary Road while biking to work, spoke in favor of the ordinance.

“I was lucky enough to be hit by a car at 25 mph instead of 35,” Radshaw said. “Drivers have a wider range of vision when driving at lower speed limits… Although changing speed limit signs will alter some behavior, more actions need to occur at the level of road design.”

Radshaw said the city should consider measures like eliminating right turns on red, adding more protected bike lanes, eliminating free parking, and linking vehicle infraction fines to the cost of the car.

Radshaw credited City Council member John Chapman for starting a discussion on social media about the ordinance. On his Facebook page, the response was decidedly more mixed than the feedback from the public comment at the meeting.

“It was good to see people share, good to hear some of these stories we need to understand as a community; the value of our pedestrians, the value of our bicyclists, the value of having folks driving that are paying attention to the rules of the road,” said Chapman. “Those are all things that we, with this policy change, want to make sure we as Alexandrians do.”

Chapman said in addition to the ordinance, the City Council should take a closer look at better enforcement of traffic calming measures.

“This has to be part of a first step to our general street design,” said City Council member Sarah Bagley. “It’s the beginning of a process rather than the only step. We need to make street design more inclusive for all.”

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Nestled away in a budget presentation for the Transportation Commission, a report on ten years of crash data shows that crashes in Alexandria are overall on the decline.

The report includes data collected from 2011 to 2020, with a note that the COVID-19 pandemic likely impacted crash data from the final year of the study. But even pre-2020, the total number of car crashes in Alexandria had been fairly consistently declining year after year.

Crashes that involve kills or serious injuries (KSI) were more erratic over the years, remaining at a fairly consistent 3% of all crashes throughout the reporting period..

“Crash totals from 2011-2020 show a downward trend for all crashes, including those that involved fatal or severe injury,” the report said. “The 2016-2020 annual crash averages by all modes (vehicle-only, pedestrian, bicyclist) and crash type (all and KSI) are less than those seen during 2011-2015. Year over year, vehicle-only crashes had the highest number of KSI crashes followed by pedestrian and then bicyclist crashes.”

The report only covered crashes on city streets — not including crashes from major highways like I-395 or I-495. Vehicle-only crashes account for most of the KSI crashes each year, followed by those involving pedestrians then cyclists.

The study tracked other information on crashes, like location, time, weather, road conditions and more. The information put together a portrait of which crashes tend to be most fatal.

“During the weekday, high crash frequencies are seen during the evening commute,” the report said. “Early spring had the highest proportion of KSI crashes for bicyclists, while the late summer months were the highest for pedestrians.”

The report found that vehicle occupants who were not wearing seat belts were 20 times more likely to be killed or severely injured.

“Most vehicle occupants wore their safety restraint (e.g., seat belt) during crashes,” the report said. “However, vehicle occupants who did not wear their seatbelt were approximately 20 times more likely to be killed or severely injured compared to those who did wear their seatbelt.”

The report also noted that 58% of all KSI crashes occurred at intersections, and intersections with five points or more had the highest proportion of KSI crashes though the total number of crashes at these intersections were relatively low.

There were roughly the same number of crashes for bicyclists in locations where bike infrastructure was present as areas where there wasn’t, but areas without bicycle infrastructure had a higher fatality rate.

“Out of the eight KSI bicyclist crashes,” the report said, “seven had no presence of bike infrastructure.”

The full report is available in the docket (page 31 of the pdf, page 4 of the docket) for the Transportation Commission’s March 16 meeting.

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