Alexandria, VA

It was another busy week in Alexandria. Here are some of the highlights.

This week, ALXnow profiled Mayor Justin Wilson and his opponent, former Mayor Allison Silberberg. The pair are facing off in the June 8 Democratic primary, and have vastly different ideas on city governance.

Alexandria Police released its 2020 crime data this week, revealing a 19% increase in Part 1 crime and 15% reduction in Nuisance crimes. ALXnow also reported a number of noteworthy crime stories, including the release of a video showing a chase suspect who died after his arrest in D.C. on April 12, and the indictment of a West End murder suspect.

This week also brought the unbelievable story of locals chasing down suspected shoplifters in Del Ray.

On the vaccine front, the Alexandria Health Department paused Johnson & Johnson vaccinations, following new concerns about potential side effects.

In school news, Alexandria City Public Schools will shift to three feet distancing in classrooms on April 26. Additionally, the School Board has started a conversation on reducing the number of members from nine to six.

Important stories

Top stories

  1. BREAKING: ‘Alexandria City High School’ chosen as replacement name for T.C. Williams High School
  2. JUST IN: Dr. Stephen Haering suddenly retires as director of Alexandria Health Department
  3. Southern Towers residents nervous as landlord steps up eviction proceedings
  4. Man stabbed at Old Town intersection
  5. NEW: Locals chase down suspected shoplifters in Del Ray
  6. JUST IN: T.C. Williams JV football team walks off field after alleged racial slur, spitting incident
  7. Man faces 10 years for DWI in horrific West End crash in Safeway parking lot
  8. Planning Commission approves controversial subdivision, plants potential loophole for future denial
  9. JUST IN: Video released of police arresting chase suspect who died in D.C.
  10. JUST IN: Six Alexandria Police officers put on administrative duties after chase suspect dies
  11. JUST IN: West End murder suspect faces life plus 13 years in prison

Have a safe weekend!

Photo via ACPS/Facebook

2 Comment

Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson doesn’t want to hold any other political office. He also wants to be elected at least once more in November, and in less than two months he’ll square off in a Democratic primary rematch against his political rival, former Mayor Allison Silberberg.

Wilson says the June 8 primary really isn’t about he and Silberberg, but more about the direction that the city wants to go. In fact, he never mentioned his opponent by name during a 45-minute conversation with ALXnow. He’s raised $90,000 to Silberberg’s $64,000, hired Henry Watkins (Sen. Adam Ebbin’s Chief of staff) as his campaign manager, and has a goal of knocking on more than 2,000 doors.

“We’re talking about the future of the city,” Wilson said. “I think what you’re going to hear me talk about in this election is policies designed to protect the city’s future, protect our residents and make sure that we build a more resilient city coming after this horrible shock of the last year.”

Still, Wilson — an admitted social media addict — has lately been posting about numerous 6-1 votes that went through during Silberberg’s tenure as Mayor. Wilson, who was vice mayor under Silberberg from 2016 to 2019, led most of Council’s opposition to the then-Mayor on such issues as development of the Silverado Memory Care facility, funding construction of MacArthur Elementary School, and approving The Spire affordable housing project. He does not mention Silberberg in the posts, only hinting that she made wrong decisions.

“If it’s unspoken, it’s gonna stay unspoken,” Wilson said. “I’m focusing on these efforts because they are benefiting our community.”

The 42-year-old Wilson is married with two children and lives in Del Ray. For his day job, he is a senior manager for Amtrak. He was elected in a special election to Council in 2007 after the resignation of then-Vice Mayor Andrew Macdonald. He lost reelection in 2009, was elected in 2012 and was elected as Vice Mayor in 2015. He then defeated Silberberg in the Democratic primary for mayor in 2018.

The last 13 months of the pandemic have brought historic change to Alexandria, and now Wilson wants to go back to in-person City Council meetings.

“I think we should be back already,” Wilson told ALXnow. “My colleagues (on Council) are uncomfortable, so it’ll be up to my colleagues to decide when we go back.”

Wilson said he will decide on a running for third term at the conclusion of his second.

“I have no desires for any other elected office,” Wilson told ALXnow. “This is the office that I wanted to serve in. This is the office that I suspect will be my last elected office.”

Read More

11 Comments

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Sen. Jennifer McClellan (D-31) was in Old Town Thursday to introduce “Women For McClellan”, an initiative to send more than 75 her female supporters around the state in the run up to the June 8 Democratic primary.

McLellan held the event outside fibre space in Old Town, although shop owner Danielle Romanetti could not participate. It was her second event outside the shop, which has gained attention since being visited by Vice President Kamala Harris and being featured on GMA3 and Lifetime.

“It is time that women, and especially Black women who have been the backbone of our party, who have been the backbone of economic opportunity, who have been the essential care workforce — it is time their needs and their perspectives are heard and met,” McClellan said. “Even in 2021, we still have to educate policymakers that sexual harassment and workplace harassment is real, and that women across Virginia face it every single day. It is time for that new perspective, and it is time for someone with that experience to solve those problems on day one.”

Romanetti said that McClellan is a hard-working legislator.

“Sen. McClellan has 15 years of experience as a legislator in Virginia and has shown that she is both thoughtful and hard working,” Romanetti told ALXnow after the event. “It is time that our state elects a woman to our highest office, and I’m proud to support her candidacy.”

While McClellan did not delve into specific policy positions, she was publicly endorsed Thursday by former Congresswoman Leslie Byrne and State Sen. Jennifer Boysko (D-33).

“There’s a saying in both politics and business,” Byrne said. “Just don’t tell me what you’re going to do. Show me what you’ve done… She has done so much over her life. She does for the Commonwealth what I hope every citizen would do. She works to make it better.”

McClellan currently trails in third place behind former Governor Terry McAuliffe and Sen. Jennifer Carrol Foy in fundraising. She’s the vice chair of the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus, and spent 11 years in the House of Delegates before being elected in a special election to the Senate in 2017.

She also said that her new group of supporters will help “shatter the glass ceiling” that has kept women out of the governor’s mansion.

“When my grandparents and parents fought for the right to vote, for the right to be treated like other citizens, they taught me through their life experience growing up in the Depression as they did under the tyranny of Jim Crow, that at its best government is a force that helps some people, that solves their problems and makes the community better. But at its worst, it oppresses some to the benefit of others,” she said.

McClellan continued, “As we face the worst health pandemic in 100 years, the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, a reckoning with racial injustice, a growing loss in faith that Virginians have in government’s ability to understand and care about their problems, let alone solve them — we need a new perspective in the governor’s mansion. Virginia has the worst record of elected women to office. It’s time to change that. We’re going to change that.”

Courtesy photo

0 Comments

Former Mayor Allison Silberberg very publicly didn’t plan on running against Mayor Justin Wilson in the Democratic primary, but as weeks slipped by and no other challenger came forward — and Council Member Mo Seifeldein dropped out — Silberberg said she felt she needed to step up.

Three years after Silberberg lost her reelection bid to Wilson, she’s back to reclaim the position.

“I couldn’t just stand by and watch our city put at risk by destructive policies of our current mayor,” Silberberg said.

Wilson has racked up several endorsements from current and former members of city leadership, including other City Council members and state legislators, but Silberberg said she isn’t particularly worried by that. Silberberg said in the last week, her campaign has raised over $64,000, while Wilson recently announced that he raised $90,000.

“I’m not concerned,” Silberberg said. “In many cases, that’s the old guard. I’m honored to have support form people across our city. We’re at a crossroads in our city. I’m a person who gets things done and I listen to people.”

Silberberg’s list of objections to Wilson is, beyond a “greatest hits” of concerns that have emerged from local advocacy groups like Bring Integrity Back to Alexandria, an extension of many of the same battles Silberberg fought with Wilson on when the two were locked in opposition during her tenure as mayor.

Silberberg said some of the biggest issues fueling her campaign are:

  • Reverting Seminary Road Changes — “Wilson took away vital travel lanes on Seminary Road,” Silberberg said. “I would restore them. It’s a major arterial road to our only hospital. It was one of the safest streets in the city, the data showed that, but in a distorted kind of way he said this is a vote about public safety. Thirteen civic associations banded together and said do not do this, it affects every resident in the city.”
  • Opposition to City Stream Restoration Projects — “I’m fighting to save Taylor Run… saving the forest there, and Strawberry Run,” she said. “I would listen to environmentalists, scientists and experts who have come forward on their own to say that this is a disaster in the making, to destroy the forest. This is some of the last remaining forests in our city, you can’t just replant and wait 30 years, because it’s not just the trees but the environment around it.”
  • School-Affordable Housing Colocation — “I’m committed to protecting limited school properties from housing,” Silberberg said.
  • Opposition to Eisenhower Slaughterhouse — “He pushed through the slaughterhouse where the existing businesses a football throw away banded together and banded the Mayor not to do that,” Silberberg said. “There are no other slaughterhouses within the beltway, and not one in our city. The impact on environmental waste is really upsetting — not to mention the smell. It was dismissive of the fact that the business owner has had numerous code violations in other states. I would not have supported that.”

Some of the reversals could be a challenge. City staff recently laid out the costs to alternatives to the Taylor Run Stream Restoration the city could be required to pursue to keep up with its Chesapeake Bay Watershed credit requirements.

Silberberg  is dubious of staff’s claims.

“Staff, with all due respect, seems to be inflating or misrepresenting the costs for alternatives,” she said. “We need to have all that vetted openly and discussed.”

Silberberg said she was also surprised and frustrated that staff hadn’t tested the soil at Taylor Run before committing the city to funding the overhaul.

“Nobody on the city staff, and they admitted this, that they hadn’t tested the soils at Taylor Run,” Silberberg said. “Someone on their own volition hired a highly regarded laboratory, tested the soils, and it came back with negligible amounts of phosphorous, that’s one of the driving forces. So basically the city admitted that they were basing their analysis and conclusions on a generic version of soil samples in a whole other region. That’s not how we want to do analysis when it comes to a treasured spot in the city.”

Taylor Run, along with some of the other issues, go back to what Silberberg sees as a recurring problem with transparency and ethics in city leadership. Silberberg and Wilson have clashed over issues about ethics for nearly a decade, including a protracted battle over a proposed ethics pledge in 2016.

“We must restore integrity and transparency and adopt meaningful ethics reform,” Silberberg said. “That is certainly a top ethics reform, and we need a leader with demonstrated record of truth, transparency and ethics, and I am that leader. I led with an ethics initiative, and the person who led the effort to water that down was then Vice-Mayor Wilson. We did accomplish some goals, but didn’t go nearly as far as what I wanted.”

Silberberg argued that information that came to light from public Freedom of Information Act requests, and later printed by the Alexandria Times, not only showed that there were behind-the-scenes discussions on issues like Seminary Road and the Potomac Yard southern entrance that the public should know about, but also that there was too much information in those that was redacted.

“Some of the lines that weren’t redacted, which wasn’t very much, showed that he distorted the truth or lied and misled the public,” Silberberg said. Read More

20 Comments

Morning Notes

Departmental Progressive Club announces candidate forum — “The Departmental Progressive Club (DPC) will hold a Candidates Forum on Tuesday, April 20, 2021 at 7pm. As a candidate for Mayor or City Council you are invited to participate. It will be held virtually and candidates and the
public will have access to the forum at 6:30 PM.” [DPC]

Birchmere founder co-writes book about venue — “For local author, musician and professional research expert Steve Moore, joining Birchmere founder Gary Oelze in writing a book about the history of the renowned and legendary Alexandria music venue, due out in June, is a true joy beyond compare.” [Zebra]

Historic garden tour in Old Town on Saturday — “Four historical properties will be highlighted: the Lee-Fendall House garden, the Ramsay
House garden, the Athenaeum garden and St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. Along the route, sites will be decorated with wreaths, window boxes, and planters created by members of the event’s sponsors: Garden Club of Alexandria and Hunting Creek Garden Club.” [Visit Alexandria]

Today’s weather — “Cloudy with light rain developing later in the day. High 68F. Winds SSW at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 70%… Rain early (in the evening)…then remaining cloudy with showers late. Low 54F. Winds SSW at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 80%.” [Weather.com]

New job: Part-time women’s health data entry specialist — “The Part-time Data Entry Specialist (20 hours/week) for EWL will be responsible for inputting the client information into VDH’s EWL database, Catalyst; working in the Neighborhood Health EMR system (eClinicalWorks); managing ongoing cases, and updating team records.” [Indeed]

Photo by Pat Malone

2 Comment

It was a historic week in Alexandria. Here are some of the highlights.

President Joe Biden visited the Neighborhood Health COVID-19 vaccine site at Virginia Theological Seminary on Tuesday, just before announcing that the date for adults to get access to the vaccine has been moved to April 19.

The Alexandria School Board, on Thursday night, voted to change the name of T.C. Williams High School to Alexandria City High School.

The School Board also voted unanimously to reduce the distancing requirement in ACPS schools from six feet to three feet, all the while community support is growing to expand in-person instruction to more than the current two days a week. Summer school is currently planned to begin in July and will be four days a week, and ACPS is planning on reopening to five days a week at the beginning of the next school year.

Our top story was on the T.C. Williams Titans junior varsity football team walking off the field after an incident with the Robinson Rams on Monday night. Robinson Rams players allegedly spit at and made a racial slur against T.C. players. The incident has prompted Fairfax County Public Schools to announce a “stand-down” meeting for all athletic teams and coaches to discuss “appropriate behaviors required to play sports in FCPS.”

Additionally, six Alexandria Police officers were placed on administrative duties after a chase suspect died while in custody. Police responded to a call for shots fired in the 800 block of North Patrick Street, and multiple buildings and vehicles were struck. The driver of the vehicle crashed on Interstate 295, and then jumped over an overpass barrier and fell more than 20 feet and was tased by police, arrested and later died.

Important Stories

Top Stories

  1. JUST IN: T.C. Williams JV football team walks off field after alleged racial slur, spitting incident
  2. BREAKING: Shots fired in Old Town leads to chase that ends in D.C.
  3. JUST IN: President Biden set to visit Alexandria vaccination site Tuesday
  4. National Park Service announces George Washington Parkway to go on a diet
  5. Neighborhood Health vaccinating thousands at sites in Alexandria, Arlington and Fairfax County
  6. JUST IN: Woman arrested after fight on King Street Metro station platform
  7. UPDATE: $8,500 reported stolen in terrifying West End robbery
  8. JUST IN: President Biden visits COVID-19 vaccine site at Virginia Theological Seminary
  9. COVID-19 update: Alexandria moves into vaccination phase 1C
  10. JUST IN: Six Alexandria Police officers put on administrative duties after chase suspect dies
  11. Fairfax County man arrested for three burglaries, released three days later

Have a safe weekend!

Photo via T.C. Williams Football Boosters/Facebook

2 Comments

Morning Notes

Alexandria woman wins $1 million in lottery — “Clarice Chandler told lottery officials “it was just by chance” she bought a ticket at Royal Farms at 5301 Jefferson Davis Highway in Fredericksburg. She claimed her prize three months later, becoming one of four $1 million winners in the New Year’s Day drawing.” [Patch]

Florence King joining City Council race as independent — “An Alexandria resident and business owner for thirty years, Florence M. King filed the organizational paperwork as an Independent candidate to get on the ballot, and is running for one of the six open seats on Alexandria’s City Council.” [Zebra]

ALIVE! announces $80K fundraising goal — “FUNDRAISE for ALIVE! at Spring2ACTion Multiply your support by becoming a FUNDRAISER for ALIVE! at Spring2ACTion., expanding our outreach, and helping us meet our goal of $80,000.” [Twitter]

Today’s weather — “Overcast (during the day). A stray shower or thunderstorm is possible. High 66F. Winds SE at 5 to 10 mph… Cloudy (in the evening). A stray shower or thunderstorm is possible. Low 56F. Winds E at 5 to 10 mph.” [Weather.com]

New job: Bartender at the Chart House — “This isn’t just your next job – it’s your opportunity to be part of an amazing team that delivers on our promise to meet and exceed our guest’s experience the moment they walk through our doors! We offer structured programs for growth and career advancement and consider our employees to be our greatest asset.” [Indeed]

2 Comment

Morning Notes

Coronavirus vaccine eligibility expandedEvery Virginian 16 and older will be eligible for the #COVID19 vaccine by April 18–but several health districts have already expanded vaccinations to all adults or will be doing so in the coming days.” [Twitter]

Alexandria expanding vaccine phase 1C — “AHD follows the Virginia Department of Health (VDH) guidance that considers a frontline essential workers’ vaccine eligibility based upon their workplace location. This means that there are Alexandria residents working in essential frontline roles outside of the city limits of Alexandria who have yet to be vaccinated as a result of their employer jurisdiction’s supply availability. Therefore, before moving to Phase 2, AHD will offer vaccine appointments to all Alexandria residents who work in Phase 1 industries, regardless of their workplace location. If you are an essential frontline worker in Phase 1a, 1b, or 1c living in Alexandria and have not yet received a vaccine appointment, pre-register online or update your pre-registration record to ensure that the job category in your profile is correct.” [City of Alexandria]

Wilson announces endorsement list in reelection bid — “I am proud to have the support of so many elected and former elected officials who know the challenges of governing not just in the good times, but in times of struggle, and have been a part in building longstanding solutions for Alexandrians.” [Zebra]

Today’s weather — “Sunny (during the day) along with a few clouds. High 79F. Winds NNE at 5 to 10 mph… Partly cloudy (in the evening). Low 52F. Winds ESE at 5 to 10 mph.” [Weather.com]

New job Boxing instructor — “An Inner Champion lives inside us all at every fitness and skill level. It’s just waiting to be released. Mayweather Boxing + Fitness – Old Town West in Alexandria, VA will offer an authentic experience for those who want to learn from Floyd Mayweather’s techniques and training regimens, while getting in the best shape of their lives in a high-intensity group fitness setting. We are currently recruiting for Instructor(s) to join the excitement and be a part of our tight-knit community at the Old Town West location.” [Indeed]

6 Comments

Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson, three incumbent members of City Council and three newcomers won the seventh annual Alexandria Democratic Committee Straw Poll on Monday night.

The unofficial and unscientific contest is held before every Council primary and is one of the first indicators of how voters are leaning. The 2021 Democratic primary for the six-seat Council is packed with 13 candidates and two mayoral candidates.

Wilson defeated former Mayor Allison Silberberg 226 votes to 176 votes, or 56% to 44%.

“”I’m excited to have a win obviously, but our focus is taking our positive message for the City’s future to the voters in advance of the June primary,” Wilson told ALXnow.

Alyia Gaskins received the top number of votes for Council, closely followed by City Councilman John Taylor Chapman.

“I am grateful to the ADC for holding this important event,” Gaskins said. “It’s a great way for voters to learn more about the candidates. I have been reaching out to voters, hearing their stories and proposing solutions to build a healthier, more just Alexandria. I am thankful to all the volunteers and supporters who’ve helped me get to this point. Now I’m focused on early voting, and Election Day after that.”

The Results

  1. Alyia Gaskins — 272 votes/14.1%
  2. John Taylor Chapman (incumbent) — 269 votes/14%
  3. Canek Aguirre (incumbent) — 227 votes/11.8%
  4. R. Kirk McPike — 183 votes/9.5%
  5. Amy Jackson (incumbent) — 182 votes/9.5%
  6. Sarah Bagley — 166 votes/8.6%
  7. James C. Lewis, Jr. — 107 votes/5.6%
  8. Meronne Teklu — 107 votes/5.6%
  9. Bill Rossello — 104 votes/5.4%
  10. Kevin Harris — 102 votes/5.3%
  11. William E. “Bill” Campbell — 72 votes/3.7%
  12. Mark Leo Shiffer — 70 votes/3.6%
  13. Patrick B. Moran — 62 votes/3.2%

The ADC Straw Poll is not always an accurate reflection of the electorate, although then-Vice Mayor Wilson defeated then-Mayor Silberberg in 2018. In that same contest, former City Councilor Willie Bailey received the most votes but lost reelection. City Councilwoman Del Pepper, Councilwoman Amy Jackson and outgoing Councilman Mo Seifeldein didn’t make the unofficial cut, either, and still won in the June primary and November general election.

9 Comments

Bill Campbell knows he probably isn’t going to be your first choice in the June 8 democratic primary for the Alexandria City Council.

It’s a crowded race for the slate of candidates, which in the heavily blue Alexandria is almost heavily favored in the November general election.

“I’m really encouraging people, after you’ve voted for all of the other reasons, friends or neighbors, your last third, fourth, fifth or vote — I think I end up in the top six,” Campbell told ALXnow.

Campbell was elected to the School Board in 2012 and reelected in 2015, but lost his reelection bid in 2018. Since then, he retired as a mechanical engineer, stayed involved in city government, and says he’s ready to fully jump back in.

“Biggest thing in my life has been: I’ve retired and my wife has retired,” Campbell said. “From a timing perspective, that’s been really good. We’ve been able to get our bills together, relax, and all our kids are out of school and in the workforce. I’ve joined the Commission on Aging, which is interesting because when i first came to the city I joined the Early Education Commission, so it’s kind of come full circle.”

In the years since he lost reelection, Campbell said he’s been happy to see the School Board-City Council relationship steadily improving — though that, too, has come under some fire from other candidates for mainly occurring behind closed doors and has seen some recent strain with questions of budget allocation.

“The most significant change has been the improvement in relationship between schools and council,” Campbell said. “We made a goal of better explaining school operations and city operations and made it a point for superintendent to improve relationships with city manager. When I first came to Alexandria there used to be huge debates over funding: fully fund schools and stuff, with people for and against Council. For the last three-four years, we haven’t had that. It’s been a good understanding and the City Council has done what they can to fully fund schools.”

Candidates in the City Council race run a full spectrum of opposition or support for current city procedures. Campbell fells pretty heavily towards the end of continuing the status quo of the last few years.

“I would approach these in the very similar manner that it’s been approached,” Campbell said. “I think it’s wrong not only for our citizens, but certainly for candidates to step up and say, ‘Oh, I would vote differently.’ There are so many things in considering the vote. We’re considering schedules and staff work and grants associated with something. There are so many things you have to consider prior to a vote, that I think it’s wrong to go back and say ‘I would have voted differently.’ I wouldn’t want anyone to vote for me if I felt like that’s something I would do. I wouldn’t want people to second guessing me on my board work.”

From his time on the School Board, Campbell has already faced a share of public second guessing. Primarily, Campbell was at the heart of a controversy involving the firing of T.C. Williams boy’s basketball coach Bryan Hill.

Hill was fired after driving a player — reportedly one of Campbell’s sons — home after practice without the parent’s permission. Parents on the team were vocal in support for Hill in the aftermath, saying in School Board meetings that the punishment wasn’t justified by the offense, but Campbell and ACPS were silent and refused to comment at the time.

Years later, Campbell still maintains some silence on the issue, and said it has been misrepresented.

“With elected officials there are certain personnel matters that you just can’t publicize,” Campbell said. “There’s often more than two sides of a story. It would have been wrong then and now to say any specifics, because it was a personnel matter, but I would encourage people to speak with people who were more familiar with the various things that occurred, and how things were handled.”

One of the more concerning accusations at the time was that Campbell forced the firing because his son was on the basketball team, but Campbell said that isn’t the case.

“It’s one of those things where you want to say so much,” Campbell said. “One thing where I think people are way off: Nothing different would have occurred if I didn’t have anybody on the basketball team. So anyone at all who implies that this had something to do with my boys or playing time, that’s just categorically not the case.”

Campbell says he’s been hurt this year by not being able to go out, knock on doors, and explain his positions to people.

“It’s different this year,” Campbell said. “This is my fifth campaign here in the city. It’s just one of these things where you just don’t know, you can’t interact the way you can normally. People just aren’t comfortable [with door-knocking] — and they shouldn’t be. So this campaign is going to be a lot of social media stuff, a lot of word of mouth, sharing information among groups. It’s interesting and difficult.”

Campbell said the big message he’s pushing is equity, particularly when it comes to ensuring equal access to housing in Alexandria.

“Probably our biggest challenge is around affordable housing, which to me is one of the most critical equity issues,” Campbell said. “If we’re really serious, and not just saying ‘diversity is our greatest strength.’ If we’re serious about that, we have to maintain affordable housing at serious levels. That equates to diversity in so many levels. Our city talks a lot about that, our value in diversity, but to me it’s very real.”

The push for equity is somewhat complicated by Alexandria’s new entanglement with Amazon — which not only has come under fire for abusive workforce practices, but is likely to drive up housing prices in currently-affordable islands like Arlandria.

“That’s the incredible tug of war between compassion and capitalism,” Campbell said. “Amazon will bring in good, solid paying jobs. At the same time, not everyone is going to have jobs that pay them six figures. At the same time, a lot of the housing that has been replaced had to be replaced… It will continue to be a challenge, we will continue to have folks that live here and live in million dollar houses that just don’t want much change at all, and then there are those living right on the edge in rental properties they can barely afford, and they want to keep that as long as they can. We want to keep those folks, but it gets tougher and tougher. I’m willing to fight as much as I can , but there are obvious tradeoffs.”

Campbell said he’ll help navigate that issue if elected to the City Council as one of six members — albeit if not as anyone’s primary vote.

“Equity, Experience, and Excellence are my three areas of focus,” Campbell said. “I want people to use all six of their votes. I want folks to take a look at ‘I’m this or that and I’ll vote for this person, but I hope with two or three votes left, you should look at who has the most experience.'”

Courtesy photo

0 Comments
×

Subscribe to our mailing list